luthierwannabe

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About luthierwannabe

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sarnia, Canada
  • Interests
    Set-up,repair and restoration of violins, viola & cello.
    Playing the cello.

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  1. Thank you all for your great response. One of our Maestronet members has offered to send me a couple of these odd tuners. The violin that one of the tuners will go on has no real worth but it has a high sentimental value .It belonged to the grandfather of the young lady who owns it and she wants to keep it in the same condition as when her grandfather played it. I agree, that if it were mine I would convert it to regular pegs. Thanks once again....Regards.....Tony
  2. Looks pretty rough. Is it Chinese or maybe home made? How about another pic?
  3. Hi, Does anyone know the name of these tuners. I think they are old Roth types. I have searched the internet for them without success. One of mine is broken and I am desperately trying to find a replacement one. I know these are very old and most not in production any more so I'm probably looking at a second hand one. Would anyone know where I can buy one or a set ? Maybe you have one sitting in your old parts drawer and would like to sell it. Thank you....Tony
  4. Hi Ratcliffe & Edi, Thank you so much for your replies. Edi...I will follow up on your lead to see what I can find on Lyon & Healy. You sure have a good memory. I have attached a few more pics. As you can see this poor thing has had a very hard but interesting life. The guy that brought it in had quite a story to tell. Believe it if you may. He bought it from an old lady in her late 80's who said that it had belonged to her grandmother who had come over from England around the beginning of 1900. Her grandmother had lived in Chicago and bought the violin there prior to moving to Canada. That is coincident with the logo info. The lady told him that she was told that this violin is the twin of the one that was played on the Titanic as it sank. I believe that violin was saved and appeared at some auction. I have to follow up on that as well. The violin is quite old. It has two small paintings on the top left and right bouts that look like some sort of heraldic symbol. They are both the same but in opposite hands. The tailpiece is unique. It is made of bone or horn and hand carved. Never seen one like that before. The neck is the through type with the ribs mortised into the neck. It has no top block. The fingerboard has been raised at some time. The other odd thing is that it is set up as a left handed violin with the base bar on the right hand side. Someone unfortunately installed a thick soundpost on the same side. I dread to think what this would have sounded like. That's all I have on it at the moment.......Tony
  5. Hi, Does anyone know who this logo belongs to? I have researched all the available labels online but cannot find this one. This was found in a 4/4 violin with the bass bar on the right hand side. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks....Tony
  6. Hi, I have a violin that has a peculiar top plate. The close grains are located on the outside rather than at center. Why would anyone do this? Is it a mistake? I tried to search for any info on the label but could not find anything on a label showing Mendelssohn. Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks....Tony
  7. Wow! Looks like I have finally found something to stump our Maestronet masters.
  8. Does anyone know the maker with this trade mark? It appears to be a star with a "f" hole outline through the middle of it. I believe the violin is a German trade fiddle. Thanks....Tony
  9. Hi DR S, Thank you very much for your reply, it is most helpful. I play cello and am of the same mind, that less is best. I think the even distribution is as important as anything.Do you use a light or dark rosin? Tony
  10. Hi Andrew, Ben suggested that this question would be more suited to the Fingerboard, as players rather that builders are more likely to be able to answer this question. So far there hasnt been much feedback at all. Rather disappointed in my first quest on Fingerboard Maybe it doesnt matter how you rosin your bow. Thanks...Tony
  11. At our small orchestra practice last week, the question came up "How do you rosin your bow?" Some people stroke the rosin in one direction from frog to tip only, others start at the middle and stroke from middle out to the frog and then out to the tip. Most just stroked the full length of the bow one way and then back the other way. Another one used short strokes, 6" or so, and worked up and down the length of the hair. Is there a preferred method of rosining a bow and, if so, does it make any difference to the quality of the sound generated? Is there any other advantage of one method over another? Thanks....Tony
  12. Hi Ben,Yes, I think you are right. I will transfer the question to the fingerboard....Tony
  13. At our small orchestra practice last week, the question came up "How do you rosin your bow?" Some people stroke the rosin in one direction from frog to tip only, others start at the middle and stroke from middle out to the frog and then out to the tip. Most just stroked the full length of the bow one way and then back the other way. Another one used short strokes, 6" or so, and worked up and down the length of the hair. Is there a recognised method of rosining a bow and, if so, does it make any difference to the quality of the sound generated? Is there any other advantage of one method over another? Thanks....Tony
  14. Thanks everyone for all your thoughts and inputs. Much appreciated....Tony
  15. I know this sounds corny, but the violin belonged to the grandfather of my client. His aim is to get it into a playable condition for his children to play on.