Scott S

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Everything posted by Scott S

  1. I'm sure that more of us here need more info about why these "clam shells" stay put. After constant tuning, these "clam shells" must still, also, tilt upstream. MORE PICTURES GUYS Do I have to fix every bridge in the house, and apologize for every bridge I've ever done? I'm willing to experiment on my own instruments. Damn, I'm out of spare bridges, lead on. Scott
  2. I see what you're saying and have never heard a good reason for this, that I know of. I've had violins do the same with new strings and then sound fine later, even when hanging up for a few weeks without being played. Scott
  3. Bothering me is......what caused this? Bad choice of wood? Extreme moisture over time? Maybe, rosin under the bridge feet? Scott
  4. A 14 watt, soft white, CFL does not have the same brightness as a 60 watt incandescent bulb, as they claim !! Around my house I am replacing 60 watt incandescent bulbs with two 14 watt CFL's by converting most of my fixtures. I'm getting boxes of 4 CFL's in Indiana for $.88, somehow subsidised by Indiana, I live in Michigan. Scott
  5. Craig said, Counter to the prupose of the nut and bridge how? Do you consider that they need to be "termination points" in and of themselves, rather than the connections at the peg and tailpiece are the termination points? This is sort of my thoughts lately. After using graphite to lubricate exposed moving parts on machinery, for parts that cannot have oil or grease on the final product, I realize what an effective lube that graphite really is. Without the graphite I believe that the strings will move and vibrate in all the right places regardless. I just think now that graphite is t
  6. Wouldn't touch it. Interesting thread and problem. Scott
  7. Changing and tuning up one string at a time keeps other things in place and means less stretching afterwards. Perlon strings can settle in faster by pinching them at a midway point and moving them back and forth, kind of violently, 1/2 inch or more. I don't use the pencil graphite anymore, It just seems counter to the purpose of the nut and bridge to me now. Scott
  8. Measuring intelligence.....that would be an interesting topic. Skill and pride in livelihood, today, compared to yesteryear's, are you serious? Scott
  9. Will. do you handle the marriage counseling too? Rue, this is a good subject. When I started I had help from an antique dealer. He would find instruments at estate sales and auctions for dirt cheap prices. These violins obviously had been looked over many times with the decision that they were not worth fixing. I did gluing, pegs, peg bushings, top removal, cleats, neck shims, bridges, nuts, saddles, etc. I did almost everything except button grafts and soundpost patches. I cannot say that I made a profit but the experience was awesome. These were sold easily at antique shows for $400 by
  10. You didn't use hide glue? There should be more government regulations concerning the use of glues on these fiddles, whatever the value. Scott
  11. If you own the instrument, do whatever you like with it. No one can tell you what you can and can't do with it, it's your instrument and your risk. Governments write laws concerning certain properties, but show me a law concerning what I can or can't do to my own instruments. When Burgess took the sawzall to that low valued fiddle, the potential damage and possible danger bothered me, but it wasn't my property. An amature "mucker" is just asking tor attacks on this forum anyway, what ever the value of the subject. Scott
  12. I think 9 out of 10 Joe Publics will look at a violin that needs various repairs, and say, "It only needs revarnished". Scott
  13. Works for me, and interestingly is a word (adverb). Scott
  14. Melvin, thanks for the feedback. The searches that I've done on Silverline give me the same opinions as you have, but not specific to this plane. I think it is comparable to our Harbor Freight, some good tools (not great), some decent and some real junk. Scott
  15. I was surfing on Ebay for old Stanley/Bailey #7s, I found new Silverline #7s, 238104, for $52.74 total, shipped from the UK. These Silverlines are also available from Amazon. They may be the same as the Quangsheng's sold under a different name. With a quick look, they seem to be a copy of the Stanley/Bailey #7s. I would expect to pay the same for a used Stanley/Bailey #7. Anyone have experience with a Silverline #7 ? Scott
  16. HEAT YOUR TOOLS. Two pages of posts here and no one has mentioned heating the tools. You need to heat your tools for more working time with hide glue. I'm doing repairs, so I rarely use a brush. Mostly, I'm using spatulas and knives to apply my glue. I use a hot plate with a small aluminum pan and baby food jar, I put my knives or spatula on top of the baby food jar, or across the pan, to warm them before and during my glue operations. Big difference in gluing time, doing this. If I use a brush, I do the same. Scott
  17. Roger, why is the Viola's fingerboard not full thickness? How does the fingerboard transition to full thickness at the other end? I'm not understanding the maple wedge under the fingerboard either. Scott
  18. Sticky tape to insulate the blocks and glue from the mould parts and ribs, where you don't want the blocks and ribs glued. I like it. Scott
  19. This gives me visions of a rodeo. You may need tips from a cowboy. Scott
  20. I think that this would depend on whether you are using a one piece lower bout rib, or two piece lower bout ribs. Is the one binding stick, only, for a one piece lower bout rib? Scott
  21. Peter, on my screen I see golds and browns, really nice for a light colored varnish, without yellows and oranges. I really like the amount of buildup at the rib to plate joints, just right. Scott
  22. Herbicides? I knew this thread would go this way, I just wanted to speed it up. No more posting for me, have a good night. Scott
  23. Ask your federal lawmakers for new regulations, I'm sure that they would love to help. Scott