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Katheryn

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  1. I have a lady who played the violin and was apparently very good. Then she quit for 42 years. She wants to start up again. I am not quite sure what to do with her. First thing she is getting her bow rehaired and I advised her to get some new Aricore strings. Then I will have her read John Holt's book "Never Too Late" (I have all my adult beginners read this, even though she is not really a beginner I think she will find it inspiring. Then I guess we should talk goals, see what music she has, what music she studied in the past. Any advice will be appreciated.
  2. Good heavens, you practice 6 hours a day? You'll be playing those Paganini's in no time.
  3. I hate to say it but with Kreutzer the motto is: "just do it" Do the one your teacher assigns, do the variations that are assigned. Don't put it off or give it halfhearted attention or you will have to play the same one again. Kreutzer really does help with progress and remediation. : Greetings, folks! I'm starting to work on the Kreutzer studies ad would greatly appreciate any advice, from those of you who have "been there," on how to get the most out of them. : Thanks for any help. : Trent Hill
  4. Hi, I don't know I have never played through or used the Dancla. Have you started Kreutzer etudes yet? They are almost like a violinists Bible for advancing from intermediate to advanced playing. That and the Carl Flesch scales and arpeggios and a lot of practice in double stops and chords.. However there are no rules saying not to try! Get some recordings of Paganini Caprices. Get some sheet music of them and follow along in your head with the recordings. Listen to them a lot. If you know someone who can play them or have a concert featuring them coming your way - GO to it. Sit as close as you can and watch intently. Try playing the Caprice that sounds and looks easiest. Try it reeeeeeeeal slow at first. It isn't going to hurt a thing. You don't have to finish a and b to get to c, but finishing a and b can make c a lot less frustrating and more accessible. You have a goal! A specific goal! That's a lot more than most string players have. We all need them. Here is another thing. If you try playing them and it is unbearably hard break that big goal of playing Paganini caprices into smaller intermediate goals. Kind of like dieting. If one has to lose 50 pounds one will lose heart at trying to lose it all at once and not even try. But if one sets a goal of 10 pounds, then another goal for 10 more pounds, then a goal of just being faithful to the diet for a month even if 10 pounds isn't reached, eventually one will get there. Good luck! : Hello. I am absolutely dying to play a Paganini Caprice! : I am about halfway through Dancla, school of mechanism. : I want to know: when I get all the way through it : and can play every exercise easily and smoothely will : I be able to play a Paganini Caprice? : Hmmm, I hope this sounds somewhat reasonable. : ....||| Thanks;; : -Michael :
  5. Hi, I don't know I have never played through or used the Dancla. Have you started Kreutzer etudes yet? They are almost like a violinists Bible for advancing from intermediate to advanced playing. That and the Carl Flesch scales and arpeggios and a lot of practice in double stops and chords.. However there are no rules saying not to try! Get some recordings of Paganini Caprices. Get some sheet music of them and follow along in your head with the recordings. Listen to them a lot. If you know someone who can play them or have a concert featuring them coming your way - GO to it. Sit as close as you can and watch intently. Try playing the Caprice that sounds and looks easiest. Try it reeeeeeeeal slow at first. It isn't going to hurt a thing. You don't have to finish a and b to get to c, but finishing a and b can make c a lot less frustrating and more accessible. You have a goal! A specific goal! That's a lot more than most string players have. We all need them. Here is another thing. If you try playing them and it is unbearably hard break that big goal of playing Paganini caprices into smaller intermediate goals. Kind of like dieting. If one has to lose 50 pounds one will lose heart at trying to lose it all at once and not even try. But if one sets a goal of 10 pounds, then another goal for 10 more pounds, then a goal of just being faithful to the diet for a month even if 10 pounds isn't reached, eventually one will get there. Good luck! : Hello. I am absolutely dying to play a Paganini Caprice! : I am about halfway through Dancla, school of mechanism. : I want to know: when I get all the way through it : and can play every exercise easily and smoothely will : I be able to play a Paganini Caprice? : Hmmm, I hope this sounds somewhat reasonable. : ....||| Thanks;; : -Michael :
  6. I am an amateur. I was not being critical of us amateurs. I was just saying what my teacher told me. She (who was a pro) played many more hours a day and week than I and wore out her strings more quickly. For someone like me, my strings would last much longer. Also my violin still sounds good with my strings on for a year or two or three. Although after reading the posts on here I may not restring with those 10 year old strings that I found while cleaning out my file cabinet. : If you have been rotting away as a drone in the string section of an orchestra, you can get away with changing only the broken string, and not the whole set, since no-one in the audience is paying to hear you as a soloist, and under the pretext that the board of directors isn't paying me enough, so I won't change the whole set. : The amateurs that your past posts have been so quick to criticize or condescend to are interested in good tone quality from all of their strings and probably more willingly make the sacrifice of changing their entire set in order to have the best possible tone.
  7. Thank you. I am learning things I should have known with all those years of studying violin. This message board is great.
  8. Hi again. I have been reading the prior postings on strings. It has been very interesting. The last time I was taking lessons (which was a few years ago) I asked my teacher about how often to change violin strings as I had heard the 6 month figure which came as a shock to me. She told me that only if one is a professional, playing 4 or more hours a day or more do you need to change strings that often. She said that for an amateur who only plays 1 or 2 hours a day or less that every year or two is sufficient for changing strings. There was some discussion on this board about not buying extra strings in advance as they can go bad without being used, that is if they are not fresh. I had never heard anything about this before. How can this be? They are not being stretched, they don't rust, the winding isn't going to come uncoiled, they won't be getting dirt and grease from fingers on them, the gut won't rot and the synthetics certainly won't rot. What is going to make them go bad? As long as I am asking questions why on earth do bows cost so much? All they are is some horsehair, some wood, (the wood may be expensive but there is not very much of it) and a few simple internal mechanisms. An elderly gentleman who lives up the road used to make violins, violas (along with bows) and guitars. When I showed him a catalog with bows costing 1 to 2 thousand dollars he was shocked and he asked the same question. He said it takes about 200 hours to make a violin but just a fraction of that time to make a bow.
  9. Does anyone know where or how one can learn string instrument appraisal? I often have people say something like, "Oh, you play the violin, we have a violin that was grandpa's locked up in our safety deposit box. Could you tell us how much it is worth? I have no idea but I have been asked often enough that I would like to learn about how to appraise instruments. I can't move of course but something like an intensive short course for a week or two I could attend.
  10. I was just looking my violin over and noticed the tailpiece has a little crack in it south of the fine tuner on the e string. It must have happened when the bridge went. Will I need to replace the tailpiece? If so, can I do it myself or do you think I need to find a good repair shop? I've been playing this violin for 25 years and have never had any problems with it so I am feeling uncertain.
  11. Hi, yesterday I replaced the strings on my violin-one at a time. Today when I started to tune it my bridge snapped. My husband is going to go to town and get an adjustable bridge today (that is what the local music store carries) but I am worried. I have always heard that it is very bad for a violin to be bridgeless for even the shortest amount of time. Any advice will be appreciated. By the way, my violin was made by my great uncle John Espeseth in Minnesota somewhere between 1900 and 1950. (It is very nice, very sweet and mellow and a golden yellow color). Does anyone else happen to have one of his violins? I heard that he made quite a few and all very nice.
  12. I am using Shirley Givens "Adventures in Violinland" with my children. She uses the image of a ships crew to position the fingers on the bow. Captain Thumb sits cown (curved) on the captains chair,(the fingers are sailors 1,2,3 and4 - I write the numbers on their fingernails at the beginning) Sailor 2, the middle finger makes a circle and visits with captain thumb, touching the silver, sailor 1, the index finger is lazy and lies down on the top deck, (between the 1st and 2nd joint), sailor 3, the ring ringer, looks out the porthole, (the white pearl circle), sailor 4, little finger, stands on its tip and guards the ship (not rigidly but curved). Then they have to ride the waves. Hold the bow hand out in front of you holding the bow with the tip pointing to the ceiling, the hair on the left, stick on the right-this is even keel. Let it drop to the left and feel sailor 4 (little finger) put on the brakes to keep it from sinking. Back to even keel. Now let it drop to the right and feel sailor 1 (Index finger) put on the brakes to keep it from sinking. The book has us do it slowly 8 times. You can really feel the shift in the weight of the bow. My adult beginners have found this helpful too, it helps to visualize what is so hard to explain. Hope it is helpful to you. : I just can't get my bow hand position down correctly at all - my instructor spends half the lesson time moving my hand and fingers into position which I consequently lose 2 minutes later. I was wondering if anyone out there had some tips that helped them or their students to have a break-through? She's told me to keep my wrist down (don't lead with the wrist), to "drape" my three middle fingers over the bow, and to use the pinky as a sort of pivot, especially when changing strings and last but not least to relax my hand. What else can you all tell me that might help? I just feel like it's not clicking with me at all.
  13. I just heard about the folk instrument called the bowed psaltery. As a string player I was intrigued to find out about a bowed string instrument which I had never heard of before. Has anyone tried this instrument and what do you think of it?
  14. : Hi Kathy, I hope you don't mind if I e-mail the numbers in Shar to you personally. I love the series and hope you find them as useful as I do!
  15. Does anyone have some good recommendations of print catalogs where one can purchase classical cd's and tapes for reasonable prices without joining a club? I am looking for a print catalog because my online time is very limited. The local music stores have an extremely limited selection and horrendously high prices. Thanks in advance.
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