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Anders Buen

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About Anders Buen

  • Birthday 06/03/1970

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    https://www.linkedin.com/in/anders-buen-4867376?trk=hp-identity-name

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Oslo, Norway
  • Interests
    Violin-, Hardanger- fiddle-, room- and architectural acoustics.

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  1. Don't underestimate the effect of bling-bling! :-)
  2. Jacob Stainer made some violins with lion heads, I believe. This instrument looks German by its colour, and it may be a mass produced one, possibly loosely based on a Stainer with high arches? I am no expert on this, however. In Norway Salve Håkedal makes hardangerfiddles with lion heads. I think it may be one of his trademarks.
  3. I do not remember now, it is more than 20 years ago. But the performer was Rupert Blom, I think. A nice Bergen guy. It was a pair her name was Gisela Blum-Feldhusen, and they had a bacground in Stainer philosophy and teaching. Very nice to talk with. I think they both were Stainer school teachers, and he stated and demonstrated that music should be experienced from behind. I still remember the reddish a bit smaller instrument. He also had and played a real chrotta with the two stabilizers from the neck. I think they originally both were German. And they lead a "Fana Unge Strykere", a chamber music group of young players in Fana in Bergen until 2013. I have read one of Rudolph Stainers books. I think he wrote 400. I liked it. Borrowed it from my sculptor aunt.
  4. I heard a concert once played on a Chrotta, a flat plated violin like instrument with the right bridge foot on the soundpost through a hole in the top. It souded violin like, as all gestures and bowing the string as well as vibrat etc contributes to the impression. On a detialed level I do not think it souded like a typical violin, although there were clear similarities. I guess some of Martys instruments may have some similarities.
  5. Probably not. The lows will be stronger than normal (given the same graduations) and the highs may not develop as well as on an arched violin. One major problem may be the worse behavior during humidity cycling than an arched instrument that may follow the variations easuer without cracking. Hermann Mayer made a flat topped trapezodial violin as well as normal ones with high and low arching and documented them acoustically. His german PhD article was translated and republished quite recently in the VSA Papers. Link to paper:
  6. Probably not. The lows will be stronger than normal (given the same graduations) and the highs may not develop as well as on an arched violin. One major problem may be the worse behavior during humidity cycling than an arched instrument that may follow the variations easuer without cracking. Hermann Mayer made a flat topped trapezodial violin as well as normal ones with high and low arching and documented them acoustically. His german PhD article was translated and republished quite recently in the VSA Papers.
  7. That was before memory started to work properly. I have three generations of makers in the family before me.
  8. 100 people in the same room dancing to HF can happen, but they probably rely on the steps from the other dancers and the player sat in the middle of the crowd. Im 54, so you are probaly not much older than me. It is a fair chance that I made my first before you did.
  9. It is possible. However, it is a custom to play the fiddles before the understrings comes on and wolves have never appeared in my small shop. There are players with a very fast and energetic bow, like Hallvard T Bjørgum. If a wolf appears it would be under his bow. The HF playing thechnique is normally «softer» and more even than what can be done on violins using trained classic playing techniques. And the bridge is flatter, so the angle of attack on the top is flatter. The top is flatter too across the top in the bridge area. The strings are lighter gauges gut, loosesly overwound gut, or with dense silver. The gauge can be changed and are available up to 12 I think. I use 10,5 which is the next lightest, allowing for higher tuning. There are other HF makers on this site, so maybe they have experiences to share? E.g. @Salve Håkedal
  10. I think this is correct. We never hear wolves on hardangerfiddles, even if some of them are built very light.
  11. https://www.google.com/search?q=youtube+allo+allo+policeman&sca_esv=36d7d91555c12cff&sca_upv=1&rlz=1C1GCEU_noNO1062NO1062&sxsrf=ACQVn0-87AJrNL8BZGRRpzLal_yRsTW0_g%3A1712157641647&ei=yXMNZvCCJ9yP1fIPtt62qAk&udm=&ved=0ahUKEwiwi56grKaFAxXcR1UIHTavDZUQ4dUDCA8&uact=5&oq=youtube+allo+allo+policeman&gs_lp=Egxnd3Mtd2l6LXNlcnAiG3lvdXR1YmUgYWxsbyBhbGxvIHBvbGljZW1hbjIIEAAYgAQYywFI4iBQqAVYoRhwAXgAkAEAmAGoAaABlAeqAQQxMC4xuAEDyAEA-AEBmAILoAL3BsICChAAGEcY1gQYsAPCAgUQABiABMICBhAAGBYYHpgDAOIDBBgAIGqIBgGQBgiSBwQxMC4xoAe1Gg&sclient=gws-wiz-serp#fpstate=ive&vld=cid:af5ac6be,vid:y1aknvtLJa0,st:0
  12. Sometimes I just decide not to do certain things.
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