Jerry Pasewicz

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Everything posted by Jerry Pasewicz

  1. This phenomenon can be increased through adjustment as well. We had the opportunity to do side by side tests and recordings of instruments both in a small ish room and in a hall with various adjustments; this effect was common to all we tested to varying degrees.
  2. Of course, and I can guarantee that was done in the Francais shop before a post was fit.
  3. It is also worth mentioning that we were working for Rene who was working for the top players in the world. He needed to know that what he was delivering was at the highest level....that is where these came in. At any point in time he could take a newly cut post to any customer from any bench and know exactly what to expect. Same with neck sets, finger boards, bridges, etc. When he got to the adjustment room, he could recognize what needed to change partly because he knew what he could rule out.
  4. This is flawed, the set up would not have any more pressure pushing on the top than setups from other shops.....and one sure fire way to improve many instruments at Morel’s shop was to alleviate pressure on the top. Andreas’s used the word “tension” not the word “tight”.... it is also flawed to assume the posts were “tight”. I certainly have seen posts that were “overly tight” that were made at the Francais shop, but I have seen “overly tight” posts from shops across the world while living n New York. These posts were predictably “tight” do to the lack of humidity in the New York winter months as a result of the heating practices of the time. During the years I spent at the shop, I was not making the posts too tight, and I was not encouraged to. I never saw Rene cut and fit a post. FWIW, I have never seen “backs pop off ribs” due to a tight sound post...or for that matter “backs pop off ribs” for any reason other than intention. I am not quite sure how much of this is hyperbole.
  5. It is hard to know what you don’t know and even tougher to learn what you don’t think exists....
  6. Thank you for passing this on...
  7. Well, sometimes it takes some “leaning” to get people to speak, participate, and judge.
  8. Yes, he leans while everyone learns..........
  9. I have put them in for people with arthritis problems as well. The pegs are geared 4 to 1 so they are much easier to tune. To each his own. Before I saw the Pegheds I was dead set against any mechanical pegs for all the common reasons. The fact is, none of my former reasoning applies to these.
  10. I do not know if you are using the term “planetary pegs” as a brand or a concept, but I think maybe you loathe the geared pegs that you can see.....there are geared pegs out there that you cannot tell are geared pegs. I understand tradition, and being stubborn, but you would be pleasantly surprised if you ever see/notice some of the top quality installations, many of which use wooden heads.
  11. I suspect you are speaking of the geared pegs that actually show the gears, like a bass. The modern geared pegs (pegheds) are a great alternative and do not diminish the value as they are completely reversible. In the 20 years or so that I have been using them they have been well received by players, and I have never had to replace any back to standard pegs. There is also the benefit of never having to deal with pegbox cracks due to the design.....
  12. I agree, it looks pretty lethal. Of course you would never use it for shipping, but I am pretty often amazed at how some bows are shipped.
  13. I do not think the problem is the material the case is made of, but rather how the bow fits inside. Most bow cases are useless if the case is dropped on the head side. The bows will slide in the case and slam into the inside end and take the head right off. There are some easy ways to modify existing cases to make them safe depending on what you buy. Bow cases should NEVER be used to ship without taking these things into account.
  14. By “optical” I mean made for glueing optics. Because of it’s refractive index appropriate for ensues, and low viscosity it is especially appropriate for tortoise fill......the low viscosity helps in this context. https://www.epotek.com/site/administrator/components/com_products/assets/files/Style_Uploads/301-2.pdf
  15. Thanks for the mention Dwight. First off, you need to figure out why the crack is there and what caused it; this is not the typical place for a rail crack. Once you have that nailed down, a good quality thin CA would work very well. As far as the chip, I agree with others here that a fill is most appropriate, as opposed to adding whole wood. The method FenwickG outlines is on the right track, although I would also add lampblack to the equation to cut down on some of the gloss. I prefer to use the optical epoxy in these situations as it allows a great deal of solids to adhesive because of the thinness of the mix, I also like the fact that the gloss is a bit more controllable. There are ways to get these disappear-ish, but they would be more invasive.
  16. Yes sir, Burgess was never going to buy you a frame........maybe the yanks are just better at it.......
  17. Don't get too excited, it was you or the Paganini Edge Filer.....but worth framing regardless I suppose.
  18. Well, the thing is you can find untold thousands of instruments with the same wear and rib bulge....how many could Paganini have owned, and how did he file so many after he was dead? Don't encourage him.....someone will have to deal with it in the real world.
  19. Yeah, Jacob is absolutely correct.
  20. I figured you probably did, but I thought I would get out the "verifiable facts" you mentioned as maybe others would take the hint...The book is only $4.99.