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Bill Yacey

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Everything posted by Bill Yacey

  1. I use a dremel for everything except the corners, but you can certainly do a lot of damage in 300 milliseconds if you don't have a strong, sure hand on the guide.
  2. It's sort of like asking over and over again "Can I live in an atmosphere without oxygen?" No matter how many times one poses the same question, the answer still remains the same.
  3. Perhaps self-taught and glueless.
  4. Merry Christmas to all those celebrating according to the Eastern Orthodox calendar.
  5. What book is that from? I don't recognize it.
  6. I can't imagine how the victim feels seeing re-runs of this, as a reminder!
  7. The maybe scroll is a clearer photo; it shows more detail. It's like people comparing music; the louder recording is usually preferred.
  8. Mike, I eagerly await for this article. I wish you a speedy, full recovery!
  9. Cochineal was only used by Strad? I think a dendrochronologist could offer more insight on the age and where it came from, as well as experts on the old Cremonese instruments.
  10. Charles Reade was a writer, and an opinionated one at that, but I don't believe he ever made a violin, varnished one, or ever made any varnish, so I wouldn't consider him as any sort of resource.
  11. I plane the two pieces individually without any issues. After the final cut, I glue them up.
  12. It's the old adage " The best way to hide something is to leave it in plain sight."
  13. A few passes gives a dead flat surface, one pass taking off the high spots, and the 2nd the finishing cut. However, the blade has to be sharp, and the cut so fine that pushing the wood past the blade is next to effortless.
  14. This is exactly how I do it, although I use a low angle jack plane.
  15. Happy New Year! May the New Year bring the end to this ridiculous pandemic, and I wish good health and prosperity to all of you, and your families.
  16. Watchya do is suspend yer handbasket b'neath a hot air balloon. Once you gain some attitude, you don't need no steering, brakes or cornering!
  17. Brings a whole new perspective of "Going to Hell in a handbasket"
  18. In my youth, I was in pursuit of shortcuts, and learned that power tools can certainly speed up the destruction of otherwise beautiful wood. By hand, the process is slower and you have a better chance of catching yourself before too much damage is done.
  19. Oh yeah? We have Cremona, Alberta
  20. My experiences show that a bent piece of spruce over time will retain it's bent shape, indicating the fibres tend to settle into whatever shape they are bent to. Because of this, I tend to think that any tension built into the bar will eventually neutralize as the bar assumes it's new shape.
  21. Hide glue can be removed with some warm water and a rag, if necessary. PVA? you pretty much need to remove some wood to get back to a virgin wood gluing surface; not exactly a positive attribute for conserving valuable instruments.
  22. Aside from using chisels and plane blades for scraping, the heaviest bonafide scraper I have used is about .040 thick. For fine work and curved surfaces, I prefer the thin stock.
  23. An edge straight off a grinder isn't as sharp as what you think it might be. If you're really interested, I would recommend Leonard Lee's book on sharpening. It's everything you would ever want to know about the subject, and more. In his book, he shows micro photographs of cutting edges achieved from various sharpening mediums, and a ground edge results in a roughly jagged, torn edge, often with a burr that is folded over. If you're happy with that, all is well, but you might want to try a highly polished edge and see if it makes a difference in the end result.
  24. The finer a polished edge you make (using a whet or water stone will make for better finish scraping. A burr straight off a grinder will be coarse and unrefined. While it will indeed cut, it'll make for rough cutting and resulting in a somewhat rougher finish on the wood because it'll be tearing the fibres rather than slicing them.
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