arglebargle

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Everything posted by arglebargle

  1. Fair enough. The top was off for a bass bar crack repair. Someone had thinned the top(he signed the inside indicating as much). The violin has not been set up and played due to the bar crack, so I can't tell you the difference before and after. My thinking went something like this, since the top is off, and the soundpost area is too thin, address the issue now, rather the after the top was back on and the sound was dissappointing or a crack developed.(I have no idea how long it's been since this violin was last played.) As the thinness was due to the actions of a previous person, I didn't have any qualms about preserving the "integrity" of the original instrument. As to why I would remove more wood before adding a patch, there was a clear depression where the post was, and in the interest of eliminating that and making a smooth surface for the patch to lay on, I scraped the area till the depression was gone. About .1 or.2 mm Yes? No?
  2. Hi all. Got called away yesterday, but thank you for all the responses. The underside of the top is deformed at the s.p. location. I'm going to opt for the maple veneer. Scrape it down to 2mm, add the veneer, then take that down a little more. Thanks for the responses.
  3. Old instrument. Top previously thinned. Soundpost area at 2.3mm. Too thin? Patch? Thanks!
  4. In my experience, the change would be minimal. If the neck is too thick, thin it. If it is really too thick, then the sound might actually "improve."
  5. ...sigh... if only we had access to REAL Dragons.......just like HE did. I wonder if the "mode quest" will be remembered in the same way?
  6. I've tried Liquin before, and it does give it a nice color. But I am uneasy about putting anything "liquid" on a bridge. I usually just dust it lightly with a mixture of dry pigments, and then rub them in and off. Thoughts on Liquin?
  7. water, bourbon, seafood toast, a sense of unfulfilled potential, salad, more bourbon, a handful of peanuts, hope, cucumber, self-loathing/love, unexpected anger, unexpected passion, bourbon, water, and now a couple of asprin. And water. All on a solid foundation of pride!
  8. I'm sorry. I am neither a smart nor tactful man, but that's one of the stupidest things I've seen. He should call it "the hell with everything bridge." Time for a drink.....
  9. Naw, I'm not buying that in this case. I'm all for going it alone, but in this field, any offer of help/instruction ought to be taken if at all possible. There is just so much to learn.
  10. A perfect point. And please, in the name of all that's holy, get some effing help. We all did.
  11. After repairing countless tops with blossoming bassbarre/soundpost cracks, I am proud to boast the loosest, most poorly fitted saddles in the business. Only 5,000 American dollars, today only! Hooooray!
  12. Fair enough. You would have to admit that the majority of ebay/violin related postings here are negative, or have there origin in some charge of fraud or bamboozlement. Seeing as how PHound is a member and regular contributor here, I simply thought the question might be better directed to him in private. But hey, no harm no foul. Play on.
  13. Perhaps it would have been more appropriate to speak to the man directly, through an email or a p.m., rather then call him out on a public forum for what seems to be a triffling, non-issue. If you have an issue with his ebay practices, tell him about it. Do you want all of us to get out the pitchforks for you? Or better yet, get off ebay all together. Look. Your looking for violins on EBAY!!!!!!!!! What exactly do you want?
  14. Say. How did that back arch get onto that top plate?
  15. Ed Campbell might debate who started down the tap tone/ mode adjusting road. As I recall, his ideas on the subject emerged at about the same time as hers. Or earlier? Or he might not. Ask Mr. Campbell himself.
  16. Yes but... If a Hutchins violin didn't work well,or even sound good, as some claim, then what does her approach matter? The world is littered with outside the box violins. Are they worthy of praise simply because they stand "outside the box"? Or that the maker had what they thought was a fully realized theory and execution? We make tools. If people don't like the sound, or the feel, or any number of other aspects, then we make wall hangings. No offense, but just because you have a firm grasp of the theory and science behind why your violins, or a violin, should sound great, doesn't mean it will. And most importantly, it doesn't mean a violinist shopping for his or her next instrument will give a flip for the science behind it. Just my silly little 2 cents. Think on, thinkers! Think on.
  17. He makes GREAT stuff. His peg shavers are perfect. I spoke with him about a step over clamp for the cello. He doesn't make one, but has been thinking about it. We had an interesting conversation about some alternatives to clamps. Good ideas. If he makes it, I will buy it.
  18. Thanks! No picture, but the description sounds right. Hooray!
  19. Yeah. I've tried all those. I've clamped a stiff piece of plywood to the ribs over the area, and used the threaded rod. And the cursed tired thumb. I don't trust that for a patch, and don't have the stamina to hold it overnight. I guess I am looking for something a bit more refined and accurate. Thanks though.
  20. So... I'm looking for a clamp that can fit over cello ribs, for gluing patches, cleats, etc to a back. An opening over 120mm, and a nice depth. Any hints or suppliers? Thanks everyone!
  21. More then once I found myself needing to bush my A-hole. The key is to make sure your bushing stock fits tightly into your A-hole, or else it may pop out with use. And be sure to lubricate your bushed A-hole, else the pegs will slip out, or even worse, lock up. Oh! And don't force the bushing into your A-hole, it may crack it! Then you'll need even more bushing. ewwww.
  22. Nooo problem. You're not to shabby yourself. :) B)
  23. Thanks Argle! You sure are a great guy. So helpful and smart.