Cuzco School

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About Cuzco School

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 03/26/1957

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ann Arbor
  • Interests
    Applied art, Theory, history, violin an pasta
  1. Definitely one will be able to find a self-satisfied answer from this forum.
  2. Tarisio has a good page on violin photography: http://tarisio.com/pages/about/photo_instr.php
  3. Hurry lads! Drop whatever you're doing and excoriate this! Made in Ann Arbor: Aluminum violin
  4. Well- if you are familiar with the instrument it is pretty obvious. Both instruments here are, as you say, 'crude' by comparison to a real one, (as well as brand new) Actually cheap hardangers made in Asia have been around for a while. There are hardanger sites on the internet describing the pitfalls of finding a real one. There have been a few authentic antique ones on eBay over the years and I used to have one myself, but one has to be really careful. This one is no good. Even without the suspicious provenance, cagey description, general clunkiness of the thing, un-pretty wood etc. Real ones are very elegant, beautiful instruments and no two are alike.
  5. Gads! This is a Chinese made Hardanger fiddle. No question about it. Here's another:<p> Chinese Hardanger
  6. No sense of humor at all...I just can't believe you prigs....it's just the limit! You have my profound pity, it's very sad, very sad...Yes, I am stupid to have even gone on this forum, (I'm sure as hell not going to learn anything on it from mopes like you) I am not the seller of this ludicrous instrument, nor am I working for the pirates that flogged it. You are a most irritating man and you overstep yourself. I do not like you even one little bit. Stick it in your f-hole buddy!
  7. Lyndon- I am of course joking, jeez! I thought you guys would get a kick out of this.
  8. Me the seller? Heck no. It kind of looks like a Hungarian instrument from the 1820s I have by a fellow named Ertl. The instrument looks pretty cool, but the seller is located in"USA" which is the anonymous seller location for most fraudulent sales, and combined with a no return policy and no feedback as a seller I wouldn't go near it either. That button is odd and it has a real looking Testore brand on it. Maybe a copy?
  9. I just want to post this to see what the lads and lassies have to say about it! VIOLIN on eBay
  10. Thanks for your replies gentlemen! I'm from New Mexico where humidity is never a problem, except its absence. Since moving to Michigan we have often thought the state could use universal climate control. There must be something up and I will have the instrument checked out again. I do hope the restorer accepts squirrel pelts in lieu of cash.
  11. I tried to find a thread relating to this: Summer in Michigan is usually quite humid. This 1938 violin neck angle dropped about 3 or 4 mm. I had it raised over the winter and my tech used a wedge between the block and the heel of the neck. Is this slippage caused by humidity or does this baby need a more expensive fix? Is 26-27 mm correct? It's at about 23 mm now. How much change happens with humidity? We've got 70-100 % most of the summer and in winter I keep it in the case with a dampit.
  12. Indeed, what's all the fuss about? It was located in Rhode Island -It would be easy enough for dealers from NY to get a look at it before bidding. If someone only buys instruments in that range, they wouldn't have a huge feedback rating. I've certainly been to enough junk auctions where there is an item of interest to experts in the field. Word gets out. The damn things break records. In Chicago there was an early Becker violin at the crummiest antique auction and I swear it went for retail. Same for a Knut Reindahl. Then in November of this last year there was a Qianlong Chinese vase in a junk auction in a London suburb sold for 43 million pounds to a dealer from mainland China. I love this particular auctioneer, they have a wide variety of antiques and it is a family run business, taking a lot of consignments. This fiddle caught my eye, I was hoping I could try for it. Most auction houses are now online, which makes it impossible to "get lucky." Oh well!
  13. Golly, I can't help chiming in! I wouldn't buy a fiddle from either of them! In fact I wouldn't buy a fiddle from any violin dealer on eBay. For instance, a year or two back, I saw a Hubicka violin on a Skinner string auction go for $800- the very next week padah-hound had the exact same instrument up on eBay and it went for 3 or 4 thousand. Did the violin suddenly acquire greater value? No, it was still a shop violin but it had the seller talking it up and a lot of bidders with more money than sense, (actually, it only takes two). Both the violins in question on this thread, the "Boston" violin on Padahs site and the Argentine label on al.romeo62s site just look commercial & uninteresting. On the other hand, I would buy a violin from a reputable antiques dealer on eBay if I thought it was good, but I would be bidding against a few eBay violin dealers as well as the collectors. As for "papers" and "guarantees" they usually aren't worth the paper they're printed on.
  14. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...e=STRK:MEWAX:IT