Gennady Filimonov

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About Gennady Filimonov

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  • Birthday 02/26/1968

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  1. Colin, with all due respect, developing good habits does not really depend on "if one is using" or not "using" a shoulder rest and an SAS chinrest. I for one, do not use a shoulder rest. I know there are many who offer advice from their experience, but then again, we are all coming from many different walks of life. As a member of odeonquartet and Seattle Symphony, I am speaking from professional experience of what works (from many years of teaching and performing). Also, saying RELAX, is not that effective. Playing an instrument well, requires a balancing act (it is actually an act of balancing TENSION). The only true state of total relaxation is when one is 6 feet under (sorry if I sound morbid). Most people underestimate the importance of the use and control of the left thumb. That is why there are some who run into problems. Shifting, playing comfortably in position, chordal technique etc. requires collaboration from the left thumb. There are many independence exercises that can help with the development of finger dexterity as well as good thumb mobility and control.
  2. PhilipG, I suggest giving it a rest for a bit because without consulting a good teacher, it is difficult to second guess what the cause of your pain is. There are several possibilities, posture being one of them but then again, if you are clutching the neck too much, that could very well be the reason. The thumb should be a "passive" participant.......setting good basics in your left hand is key to good technique. Playing guitar well, can only help IMO. Best is to find a good teacher in your area who can guide you (to salvation Check out "Basics" by Simon Fischer.
  3. with all due respect Strazart, strangely enough despite the fact that many folks attribute Stradivari's success to the "Little Ice Age" which occurred around the time of his birth, most of his contemporaries (aside from the Guarneri family) did not achieve the same result (despite the slow growth trees etc.). After all, other makers (including Bohemian and Tyrolian) were getting their wood from the same forests. Obviously, he truly was better than most makers (to have achieved the results that he has).
  4. nevertheless, despite the generational gap, the soloists of the past were more bel canto players and more able to produce original works (of composition). Does that say something about the musical institution(s), or is it a reflection of our times (homogenization of high culture with low culture)?
  5. .....one of my favorite subjects. Perhaps we can rename it "Geneology of Violin Pedagogy" : Even looking at Galamian who " mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman';"> after violin studies with Konstantin Mostras (a disciple of Leopold Auer) in Moscow studied with Lucien Capet in Paris (Galamian came to the United States in 1937). He obviously combined the best of these schools. When we look further back at violin history (before Capet, Ysaye, Auer etc.), much of the developments came from the Italian (which via migration of Viotti from Italy to France became the French school), French and German schools. Leopold Auer, himself a student of Jacob Dont & Joseph Joachim, was the product of these schools. At the end of 18th century Viotti (the "Italian export" in Paris) founded the Paris Conservatoire. The school he (Viotti) founded, whose pillars became Pierre Rode, Rodolphe Kreutzer, and Pierre Baillot (all professors at the Paris Conservatoire), would follow the example of their great Italian mentor in matters of style and musical taste, and influence the violin concerto even into the late romantic age. Baillot, himself a student of Viotti, building on the pedagogical work he and his colleagues had accomplished at the conservatoire in the 1790s, would later write one of the most influential books on violin technique "The Art of the Violin". Thus was the migration of the Italian style to France creating the French school. Incidentally, Viotti enjoyed phenomenal success not only in France but in Germany, England and Russia. It can be safely said that he ranks as the founder of the modern school of violin playing. ps: it was not until the 17th century, thanks to the development of the early sonata form that the VIOLIN reached a position of rank in the history of music. And it was the Italians that dominated the scene from Carlo Farina, an early “virtuoso" (1620's), G. B. Fontana (showing the early primitive form of the Classical Violin Sonata), G.B. Vitali (1644-1692) the first great master of the violin sonata. After Vitali, G. Torelli (1657-1716) added a new musical form—the violin concerto. Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713) a great virtuoso, after whom the violin became one of the most important mediums. After Corelli, the greatest representative of the classical Italian school was G. Tartini (1692-1770). He was equally eminent as a performer, teacher and composer for the violin and exercised enormous influence in matters of violin playing for more than half a century not only in Italy, but in Germany and France as well. With him the exclusive Italian school of violin playing reached its zenith and the pupils of Corelli and Tartini formed the connecting links between that school and the subsequent schools of France and Germany. Violin playing culminated with Nicolo Paganini (1784-1840). Good books which are commentaries, are: "Violin Virtuosos; from Paganini to the 21st century" by Henry Roth and "The Memoirs of Carl Flesch" as well as " mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman';"> `The Art of Violin Palying,` by Flesch.
  6. incidentally, zac de pue is also playing with his brothers http://www.thedepuebrothers.com/bios.html and he has been appointed Concertmaster of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and will begin his position in September 2007.
  7. there are also quite a number of musicians today who are quite unique and are not afraid to go against the norm. Gilles Apap is one such player, covering the field from Mozart to blues (all in one night, sometimes even in one piece for that matter). There is also Time For Three who are making lots of waves. They are classically trained string musicians and all are Curtis grads. ranaan meyer, nick kendall, zachary de pue, http://tf3.com/content/view/13/40/
  8. they are great. I know Erika and Adela since we were kids in school. Always been very natural talents.
  9. Despite the significant problems in the last few years, the prognosis looks good. After all a healthy music scene in our country is imperative not only for orchestras, musicians but makers as well. check out this article in the Wall Street Journal: "The Changing Nature Of The Orchestral Business Michael Linton says that orchestras aren't in danger of fading from the national cultural scene, so long as they recognize the evolution of their role in it. "Music managers typically think that their job is to present the highest level of musical performances possible and pay for them by selling seats and catching grants. It isn't... Music executives' real business is developing communities of patrons. And educating their children." Wall Street Journal 07/14/07 http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1184362926...=googlenews_wsj
  10. are modern violin masters superior to the old ones? what made the Golden Age of violinists so enticing and special? In the past, many great virtuosos (back 200-300 years ago) composed their own works....where is the modern day "genius" heading? Let's discuss and see what you all think about it.
  11. quote: Originally posted by: Gennady Filimonov Jeffrey, I am not sure I made a clear picture of my experience. I've also been lucky... I've seen, heard, and played a great many very Fine Fiddles, both old and new. A great instrument also needs a great player to show its true self. And like I mentioned before, a great instrument in the hands of a mediocre player, will fizzle into mediocrity for the time it is being played (by that individual). It can only recover when it passes into worthy hands. So the moral of the story in my opinion is that a great player will may anything sound terrific (even a shoe box). But a great instrument can take that talented player to new heights and show him/her what they have been missing. correction: So the moral of the story in my opinion is that a great player will make anything sound terrific (even a shoe box).But a great instrument can take that talented player to new heights and show him/her what they have been missing..
  12. Jeffrey, I am not sure I made a clear picture of my experience. I've also been lucky... I've seen, heard, and played a great many very Fine Fiddles, both old and new. A great instrument also needs a great player to show its true self. And like I mentioned before, a great instrument in the hands of a mediocre player, will fizzle into mediocrity for the time it is being played (by that individual). It can only recover when it passes into worthy hands. So the moral of the story in my opinion is that a great player will may anything sound terrific (even a shoe box). But a great instrument can take that talented player to new heights and show him/her what they have been missing.
  13. Glad to se you came to that conclusion. Now you may understand why we players spend so much time hunting for the right bow. It is why I amassed a collection of more than 2 dozen bows old and new.
  14. quote: Originally posted by: Gennady Filimonov Hi Ray, I put the new strings on another fiddle (my Bisiach). I will put them on my Vuillaume next week and let you know. In the meantime feel free to email me about a LeCanu bow. The last two bows I had (from LeCanu and Bigot), went to wonderful notable players. They love their new bows. Ray, I just put them on my Vuillaume, and they are superb!
  15. quote: Originally posted by: Gennady Filimonov Yuen, I think you are missing the point. This great instrument went un-noticed since 1930's. When I picked it up, I had no idea what it was, since it was too dark in the place to see. It was also played for that long by more or less an amateur violinist, nevertheless it never lost its "soul". Consider also that it did not see any great Luthier for that long either (for set ups and maintenance) , since Altman had to be careful that it would stay hidden from knowledgeable eyes. For all I knew (at the time), it could have been any fiddle. I had no preconceived notions about it (its worth, its status etc.). All I know is, I liked what I heard in it and that turned me on to it Obviously when the whole story unfolded, I was happy to know that it turned out the way it did, and to know that at least I was able to recognize a great fiddle just by its sound characteristics. I forgot to mention, that I have also heard some of the great instruments played by very mediocre individuals, and unfortunately the instrument does not play itself (if you know what I mean?).