luthier

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About luthier

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  • Birthday 06/26/1949

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  1. What about cleaning the inside of a violin by a known maker from about 250 years ago? Should one try to remove some of the caked on grunge? It's definitely not original, but does testify to it's age. What would be ethical here?
  2. Yes, violins by E. H. Roth had this type of saddle, but I don't recall the dates. Early ones and later ones didn't. I know that in the 60's this type of saddle was used. Other makes of violins also had it as well. It may be a German/Czech sort of thing.
  3. It could be a non ebony fingerboard that has been blackened and varnished.
  4. If you are looking for a Stradivari at an unbelievable low price, here it is!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! https://www.ebay.com/itm/STRADIVARIUS-VIOLIN-antico-violino-italiano/123787077177
  5. I found the original listing, if anyone is interested. https://www.ebay.ie/itm/A-Fine-Old-French-Violin-labelled-N-Audinot-Possibly-Collin-Mezin-/132829601063
  6. On a side note, there are many cheap Chinese paint brushes and expensive varnish brushes with a 1:30 taper. I use them to work in spiral bushings (candle wax applied to the handle). Looks like you are using one in the endpin hole.
  7. Does anyone have any information on this maker? I have one of his violins dated 1980, and there is currently one for sale on the internet dated 1930. He isn't listed in Jalovec. The name is German. (I don't know how to place the umlaut over the u on my keyboard). The label reads: Alexander Grune Salzburg fecit ano 1980 the add I had a link to previously has been deleted, probably sold...edited 4/6/19 Thanks
  8. I opened a nice trade instrument and found someone had applied a very thick coat of hide glue to the entire inside. What was he/she thinking?%&^*(*$#@
  9. I see the edge work, bottoming out a good distance inside the purfling, and the blackened pegbox interior. I doubt it being Chinese or French.
  10. I see the edge work, bottoming out a good distance inside the purfling, and the blackened pegbox interior. I doubt it being Chinese or French.
  11. I'm only lesser qualified to ID violins, but I will say it appears to me of high quality, either recent or extremely well cared for in it's life, possibly of German origin.
  12. I'll assume these repairs are followed up by cheek patches? I glued one up using Jacob's method recently, and put it away awaiting the cheeks.
  13. In the JGC violins I've seen, the ribs are cut from a flat board, with the corners cut out; the inside of the rib is flat and strait. It is then bent to form. To cut out the ribs from a board to the violin shape would result in end grain on the top and bottom of the ribs, which would have no stability at all, not to mention the same problem above and below the bouts.