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deans

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Everything posted by deans

  1. I believe this is where a lot of this wear comes from. People anchoring their thumb on the side of the fingerboard during pizz, Easy to get sloppy when playing long periods in orchestra.
  2. I've seen my share, one of the makers you will see a lot when shopping for violas. Must have made a lot. Usually pretty good sounding. Sometimes the workmanship looks a little rough. Yours looks like a really nice example
  3. I think the Trampler Amati is an example of one that was cut down and is still ~17.5. And I believe some of the Gasparo violas that are around 17.5 were originally over 18
  4. Finally a violin where anyone can shoot the fingerboard.
  5. I suppose it could have been enlarged, but I have never seen an instrument enlarged by an equal amount all around the outline. I'm thinking an old wider purfling channel was filled in and new purfling added.
  6. If you could easily sell this for that amount I believe there are a lot of violin shops that would hire you as their salesman.
  7. I believe its just under 16. Tertis supposedly had a 17" Testore, not sure where I read that. At one point I was shown a "Testore school" that was 17, it was a while ago and I have no idea if it was as advertised. Tertis also famously had a 17" "Montagnana" but I think that was misattributed. Still have to wonder what it is. There seems to be a lot of 17-17.5 violas made north of Italy, some have probably been Italianized. The Michael Tree Busan was around 17, but I believe its was made towards the end of the 18th century. Just a few thoughts.
  8. Many here in the US are in the same situation, and much of the string world has lived off of mail order. Its not a big deal. Just a quick search revealed a firm called whitehorse music out of sydney, maybe you could ask around about them. Found because they stock Jay Haide. Dont want to sound like a shill for that particular brand, there are plenty of others, but it just happens to be something I have seen having good success, and perhaps a good low risk choice.
  9. Thanks for responding. The Dutch/ English wood connection is an interesting tidbit. Was this known before dendro came along or is it something you discovered?
  10. When it comes to Jay Haides, other than fractionals, I almost never see them for sale in the used market, and there's a fair number around here. Its hard to say what the resale value is. But I think two things are at play, they are relatively easy to trade through the teaching community, and some people just keep them, even after upgrading. French or German trade instruments can also be a great choice, if you find one you like go with it.
  11. In the grand scheme of things I would say modern synthetic strings are overall better. But there is a certain sound and feel that only seems to come from gut (both plain and gut core) and I get a lot of enjoyment playing on them. Everyone should give it a try at some point.
  12. I believe this general configuration was still fairly common through the 1950s-60s. Heifitz is an example of someone who stuck with this setup even after that. Of course tinkerers, such as myself, play around with this configuration today. Gamut strings even offers a remake of Tricolor G to come as close to Heifitz setup as possible.
  13. I would email Ifshin in CA and ask there might be a dealer there, or maybe they could ship. See what your local shop has, gotta be something similar down there.
  14. The Jay Haide line is popular around here. It would be my first choice. Or another similar well set up Chinese instrument.
  15. I believe if they really wanted these to be confidential you would have to sign some sort of nondisclosure form, or at least it would have some verbiage to that effect. Perhaps it is in the user agreement for the site, which I did way too long ago. I suspect they make you request them mainly for marketing purposes, to see what people are interested in.
  16. my opinion, take your original budget to a shop where you will get something reasonably well set up and who will provide some service. You will probably end up with something Chinese, but thats OK.
  17. Looks like its worth taking to a luthier. Buy just what you can see in the pics will run a couple grand where I live.
  18. Looks strange to me. The body looks like a late 19th/early 20th century trade violin with a head from around 1850. A lot of early 19th century Neukirchen violins have ivory edges like this, but this seems much later. Maybe somebody was just tinkering around.
  19. Lot 30 in Tarisio I assume. Could just be a mistake, you might want to ask. Perhaps it came with one of the violas? Once in a while you find a violist using a violin bow. If it is a mistake they would probably want to correct it.
  20. Thanks Martin. I assume they do not have enough data to ascertain the woods geographic origin then? Perhaps someday they will.
  21. Yes, this is what I meant. I wouldnt be surprised if the tree lived its life outside of both countries. Since Parker seemed to be familiar with his Italian contemporaries, I might suspect that he knew the wood sources. But maybe this is an impossibility. Just curious.
  22. Just curious. Why does this mean its not a Rogeri? Arent there many of examples of different makers having wood from the same tree? Maybe Mr Ratcliff could comment. Wonder if there are English/Italian matches.
  23. Or lower, the way the pound has been lately...
  24. Gotta be some british cellos up there in price. Forster, Kennedy, that sort of thing. Maybe a Lott violin? Anyway this viola checks a lot of boxes for somebody looking for a special instrument
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