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deans

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  1. Slightly related, when using a plain gut D, I use a bridge in which the notch is a little deeper, to bring the thick D string down a bit. People might scoff, but to me that extra thickness is noticeable in terms of curvature.
  2. I would contact Dan Larson on this topic. https://www.gamutmusic.com/varnished-strings I never tried varnished strings myself, always go with plain.
  3. deans

    Violin ID #7

    You'll find one.
  4. deans

    Violin ID #7

    Yes, I dont want to put anyone on the spot. Maybe I need to back up a bit and ask the OP a couple questions. Why do you even own the instrument? What are your goals for it? I realize you were just asking for an ID, not any advice, perhaps I've made too many assumptions. But I've already butted in so I'l just add my two recommendations. 1. If you really want an old Saxon instrument for yourself, set it aside until you are comfortable paying up for restorations or perhaps you become a good restorer yourself (you already expressed reservations) 2. If you really werent specifically in the market for one, liquidate it to a shop who can do both good work and find a happy customer who has been searching specifically for something like this. This is the situation that might work out economically positive for both yourself and the restorer. Maybe there is something in between that.
  5. deans

    Violin ID #7

    I am just giving the numbers as I see them, what I have paid, what I have been offered, what I see retail, and what I see at auction. It is nothing to do with "rubbishing" anything. Yes, It was a mistake for me to compare it to the costs of new student instruments. Just trying to give some perspective. You are a restorer and a fan of of these instruments, this would probably be perfect for you, but I want you to consider for yourself how much cash you would pay for this instrument, right now? That would be a very useful part of this discussion, but I dont want to put anyone on the spot. I dont want the instrument to be ruined. But at the same time I wouldnt encourage the OP pay the costs for a proper restoration for an instrument that may not work out for him. As I said, its borderline. If it were a little better, or a little worse, it would be an easier call. I have a Gutter in the same condition, (maybe a little worse) and am pondering the exact thing for myself.
  6. deans

    Violin ID #7

    I agree with Strado, a bad repair would put this in the closet forever. I might see this bring a $1000 at auction, not a bad offer. But I would be surprised if any of our restorers here would pay that much cash. And think about, $1K doesnt exactly line up with "rare" or "desirable" in the violin world. That's less than half the price of a Rudolf Doetsch. Probably cant even buy the lowest grade Jay Haide. Sure, BF, Jacob, myself, and a few others like things like this, but we are not enough to drive the market up.
  7. deans

    Violin ID #7

    I'm not sure what you mean. But I think its a difference of where we live. Shops here do not want to waste a lot of time on other peoples repairs, they have their own work to do that's more profitable. If they think the customer might have some remorse afterwards concerning the economics, and give them a hard time, they will quickly go to the "not worth fixing" and move on. This one's close, I would only have it restored I was certain I wanted to keep it. I know these type of instruments fairly well, I see what they sell for at both shops and auctions, and I know I'd have a hard time getting 2-3K out of one myself, I guess I'm not much of a salesman. Maybe at auction. I
  8. deans

    Violin ID #7

    Not to drill this into the ground too much. But I think every shop wants to warn customers that even though an instrument might retail at 2-3X the repair, the wholesale price an individual can get might not be equal to the repair. Just in case the customer gets mad if he was thinking he is going to flip it. Especially if he is thinking of flipping it through the same shop. A suppose a lot of shops deal with more flippers than end users in these situations.
  9. deans

    Violin ID #7

    I agree with this 100% especially looking at it from your perspective as someone who works as restorer. I also agree with this. This is my perspective. I have done it myself, usually happy with the results. But I'm not a flipper (usually), unless you want the instrument for yourself you better sharpen your pencils and have connections. It sounds like you and I are in complete agreement.
  10. deans

    Violin ID #7

    Once again I think we are closer than you think. If the OP is in the market for a good old Saxon instrument, and didnt pay too much, I think he/she made a great buy, even with the risk of not knowing what it sounds like. I would encourage them to plop down $$ for the best work. But if the intention is anything other than end use, if he/she wants to realize monetary value, then they have to be careful. I just hope the OP takes it somewhere good for repairs, or just sells it as-is to someone like yourself. I like these things but I have enough.
  11. deans

    Violin ID #7

    Yes exactly, a violin that retails $6-8K of any type. If it needs the top popped off for repairs, a full setup, pegbox work, etc, you are looking at $2-3K+ for good work, that's close to the wholesale/cash value for an individual who is not a dealer. I would put it at borderline. Many instruments fall into this category. Then the question would be do you try to do it yourself? Or take it to a less experienced repairman? I assume you are in the trade (IDK) but shops pay cost for repairs and can realize retail prices. Individuals have to pay full price for repairs and have a very hard time realizing retail prices. We are coming at it from different perspectives. BTW, I wanted to post this before the site went down, since some people are interested in this sort of thing. The Ficker I have also has a one piece bottom rib (hard to tell with the flames) as well as an inlet saddle.
  12. deans

    Violin ID #7

    Nope. My Ficker has its original neck. As do 3-4 similar instruments. I bought them for that reason and they will stay that way. I doubt I will profit from them though. They arent really "baroque" btw. And Im not suggesting the OP gets a neck graft.
  13. deans

    Violin ID #7

    As an end user I see a few things. First the costs of good repairs is currently at a premium. Luthier time is more valuable than it used to be. And shops seem to always judge these things from a business perspective. That's why we are often told this, and often they are right. This is a classic borderline case, I have half a dozen instruments very similar to this one. The cost to get them running is close to or more than the wholesale value (how much cash would a dealer pay for this violin?).
  14. deans

    Violin ID #7

    I doubt in reality we are too far off. I've seen some top shelf prices for nice examples that are pushing 20K for violins from this school, but the most I've known one to actually sell is a JGF for 14K, a really nice example . I would expect something comparable to the OP would sit in a rank-and-file shop at 6-8K set up as a period instrument, but I don't see a dealer paying much for it in its current state. And certainly in my town most of the shops would tell somebody to turn right around if they came in asking for a restoration. I might get it done though, I like these instruments but I would set aside about 2-3K to get it done right and not expect to get my money out of it.
  15. deans

    Violin ID #7

    We are in agreement for the most part, and we are talking about the same thing. Yes there are many more through neck fiddles from the mid 19th century, these are often worth less than a 100 bucks. How much does a real ICF actually sell for in your country? I'll bet it's comparable to here. BTW the price for good restorations is pretty high right now in the US. Hard to find a good restorer who starts at less than $1K just to get the top off of an instrument. The bar for something worth fixing is getting higher and higher.
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