Ratcliffiddles

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About Ratcliffiddles

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  • Birthday 04/22/1961

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  1. I think you lot may be right, the corner blocks extending high up into the C bouts is more like French work, and yes, probably a bit older than I originally thought
  2. Actually, I thought it was Mittenwald, I can't really see what's happening with C linings and blocks but for the rest, stylistically doesn't look French to me. It's also got that original saddle, that you won't see in French of the period, but will in Mittenwald.
  3. Depending on how it's lit, it can look quite stunning.
  4. Looks 18th century French to me
  5. Stylistically, it looks like something from Salzkammergut area. I have tested a few from that region, but not always had success dating the wood. Beech would not be unusual for back, sides and scroll.
  6. I'll have a go as soon as I receive suitable images...Some American instruments I have tested were definitely made with European wood, and I will run it against the US references I have.
  7. Mittenwald, or a similarly low grade French, they too can have these wide grained one-piece fronts, The corner-blocks and lining would settle for one or the other.
  8. Looks French to me too, probably 1860 ish
  9. It tells you that the latest ring present on the treble side grew in 1783 ( the tree was therefore still standing in the forest in that year). When the tree was felled, as mentioned previously, is a matter of conjecture. Bearing in mind that you may lose a few rings planing the centre joint, probably a very miminum of 2 (likely more on a cello), the very earliest this tree was felled was 1785, but most likely later. On the bass side, the latest ring is 1790, so again the very earliest felling date has to be after 1792. A making date is likely from about 1800, it could possibly be a couple of years before , or anytime after. It also shows clearly that the 2 halves are from different trees, and that their growing locations may be related since as a significant correlation was identified between the 2 ring-series. One side shows significantly wider rings than the other, which may suggest a location at lower elevation than that of the other tree. No, you cannot assume a making date of just before 1800 based on the dendro report. However, on stylistic grounds, 1800 would not be far from the actual making date.
  10. I don't think that's Markneukirchen, it looks like a decent French violin, "Caussin type" to me.
  11. Pretty sure it's one of from the JTL workshops. I have seen very similar ones with a "6" label as well as the JTL one
  12. I think the Cappa labelled ones were from the JTL shop
  13. Sometimes, Little old ladies do exist, and some do have Italian violins, some good, some bad, some indifferent.