Alejandro

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About Alejandro

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    Manila
  1. Hi Bill I am unable to open the sound file but I think I know what you are referring to. The song is called "Transylvanian Lullaby" and this was composed by John Morris. As a matter of trivia, Gil Shaham recorded it with Jonathan Feldman playing the piano (PS: no relation I think to Marty Feldman who plays Eye-gore in the comedy Young Frankenstein hahaha) in Shaham's CD entitled "The Devil's Dance". I hope this helps..
  2. If I may add, the book recommended earlier by Marty is also a great read especially if you can relate to the difficulties of playing the Bach Chaconne. Have fun!
  3. You may also want to consider "The Violin Maker" by John Marchese, Harper Collins, 2007. It was a very interesting insight. Short Synopsis ( I hope I don't spoil it) John Marchese befriends Sam Zygmuntowicz of Brooklyn, New York. He is already aware that Sam had built instruments for many of the world's top musicians and has now been approached by Eugene Drucker of the renowned Emerson String Quartet for a commission for a violin. Eugene's current violin was a 1686 Stradivarius and he commented that the violin could be temperamental, particularly under a rigorous touring schedule that the Quartet undertakes. The challenge is now for Sam to build a violin for Eugene that can, at the very least, compare with (or better still surpass) the Strad but at the same time be able to adjust to the changes in weather and humidity because of the touring schedule.
  4. Sad to hear... Didn't he write under the pseudonym "Falstaff" for some time? Or am I mistaken?
  5. Hi. I bought a set of Nakamichi noise-canceling headphones in the Singapore duty-free shop for SIN$130 (around US100) just last December and am very happy with them. The set comes with an on/off switch for the noise canceling effect and with volume control. For me, this is incredible value.
  6. You can also go see Tom Lee Music Store. It is a huge store (3 stories) that has everything from all types of musical instruments, scores, etc. to professional audio equipment. They have many branches all over Hong Kong but you must go to the main store in Cameron Lane, Tsimshatsui, Kowloon. It is an amazing store. The main store is just off Nathan Road (busiest street in Tsimshatsui) -- Cameron Lane is a short alley along Cameron Road which in turn in just across Kowloon Park. You will not regret visiting this store. Yes, they also have violins (both acoustic and electric) but the range in selections for the acoustic violins is not as extensive as Hong Kong Strings (no luthier though). But do visit the store anyway
  7. I suggest you visit Hong Kong Strings in Central. It is in Parker House along Queen's Road near corner Pottinger street. Note that the entrance to the building is very narrow. But your landmark is H&M department store. They have a fairly good variety of budget and good instruments (considering it is Asia) and a good supply of scores, supplies (strings, pegs, etc). They also have a good return/upgrade policy. They also have a resident luthier (Charlie) who can do repairs if needed. Here is their web link: http://www.hongkongstrings.com/index.php?thispage=webpage&webpage=contactus Alejandro
  8. Maybe that is part of their master plan to promote Chinese violins But seriously, if someone didn't bring up the issue of the site slowing down I would never have noticed.
  9. With all due respect to the previous posters, I have not encountered any slowdown. I live in Asia and log into Maestronet almost everyday to read the posts. And I have not had any difficulties at all or any lag in moving from page to page. Just sharing my thoughts and experience. Alejandro
  10. Very very nice work, Luis. It is super gorgeous. Was "Rebecca Clarke" a commission?
  11. Hello all I have a CD of an Elizabeth Wallfisch recording of the Bach partitas and sonatas (from Hyperion). The recording was made in 1997. I am very happy with it and use it as one of my references when studying any of the pieces. I enclose a review of the CD below. Cheers Alejandro -------------- A review by Brian Blackwell says: "Elizabeth Wallfisch has yet again proved herself to be one of the most exciting violinists on the period performance circuit with her new recording of the Bach Sonatas and Partitas. The big test for any recording of the Solo Sonatas is in the fugues, and I am pleased to say that Wallfisch succeeds admirably. Her tempi are spacious, but have wonderful rhythmic bounce, allowing the complex contrapuntal writing to be much more comprehensible than usual. Contrast this with Milstein for example, who makes the fugues sound like hard work. The faster movements are truly delightful. Wallfisch utilises a rich variety of bow-strokes, making the passagework livelier, without ever sacrificing the structure of the music. Her warmly lyrical approach to the slow movements is also very appealing, with just the right amount of vibrato. She avoids the eccentric swelling which sometimes finds its way into HIP performances. The great Ciaccona is given a monumental performace capable of standing up against any of the great performances of the past. The set is excellent value, appearing on Hyperion's new Dyad 2 for the price of 1 series. Even those who are against period performance should check out these recordings. Highly recommended." Elizabeth Wallfisch has yet again proved herself to be one of the most exciting violinists on the period performance circuit with her new recording of the Bach Sonatas and Partitas. The big test for any recording of the Solo Sonatas is in the fugues, and I am pleased to say that Wallfisch succeeds admirably. Her tempi are spacious, but have wonderful rhythmic bounce, allowing the complex contrapuntal writing to be much more comprehensible than usual. Contrast this with Milstein for example, who makes the fugues sound like hard work. The faster movements are truly delightful. Wallfisch utilises a rich variety of bow-strokes, making the passagework livelier, without ever sacrificing the structure of the music. Her warmly lyrical approach to the slow movements is also very appealing, with just the right amount of vibrato. She avoids the eccentric swelling which sometimes finds its way into HIP performances. The great Ciaccona is given a monumental performace capable of standing up against any of the great performances of the past. The set is excellent value, appearing on Hyperion's new Dyad 2 for the price of 1 series. Even those who are against period performance should check out these recordings. Highly recommended." -------------
  12. Hello Here are more direct contact details for Singapore: LE DIAPASON 261 Waterloo Street #02-44, Waterloo Center, Singapore Office hours: 10am to 7pm (Tuesday & Friday closed) Telephone: +65 63377192 Fax: +65 63377692 Email: info@le-diapason.com Contact person: Michelle Lin Min Zhe (Business Manager) > michelle@le-diapason.com Comments: they are very professional and super helpful; they have sales of stringed instruments and also do restorations & repairs (both instruments & bows) SYNWIN MUSIC 845 Geylang Road, #03-01, Tanjong Katong Complex, Singapore Office hours: Tue-Fri 11am to 830pm; Sat/Sun 11am to 530pm (Mondays and holidays closed) Telephone: +65 67437865 Fax: +65 67434862 Contact person: Wayne Yap (he's not the manager but he sure is pretty good violin player) Comments: their card says "manufacturer & distributor of musical instruments" -- not sure if they accept repairs though. Best to call I hope that helps Alejandro
  13. Hello. I've had very good results in playing in a cavernous church using this AKG C411 violin microphone that can be attached to the bridge or top plate without harming the violin. I have attached a description from the manufacturer for your convenience. Aside from the microphone itself, you will need either the wireless transmitter pack or the B29L battery pack (which is what I have and attaches to your belt). The output is already balanced so I can plug directly into a mixing board or an amp. In my particular case, I have a small mixer which I then connect to the amp. I can also adjust the tone controls from there. Btw, the battery pack has two inputs allowing you to switch to a viola (or cello) if needed without having to unplug. The mic works on picking up the vibrations (like the clip-on mics) so there is no worry about feedback and/or ambient noise at all as compared to the traditional mics. I am very happy with it ----------------------- Product Description From the Manufacturer Weighing only 18 grams (0.6 oz.), this ultra-light condenser pickup is ideal for acoustic guitar, mandolin, violin, and most other stringed instruments. The C411 will give a clear and uncolored sound without changing the balance of the instrument. Attaching the C411 on or near the bridge or anywhere else on the instrument is easy with the included non-marring, reusable, solventfree adhesive compound. Technical Specifications Polar pattern: figure-eight (vibration pickup) Frequency range: 10 to 18,000 Hz Sensitivity: 1 mV/msec-2 (vibration pickup) Max. SPL: 100 dB (for 1% THD) Impedance: 200 ohms unbalanced Recommended load impedance: >=1000 ohms Supply voltage: 9 to 52 V phantom power to DIN45596 or battery powering from B29L or AKG bodypack transmitter Current consumption: approx. 2.2 mA Connector: 3-pin mini XLR Cable: 1.5 m (5 ft.) Finish: matte black Dimensions: 27 x 14 x 9.5 mm / 1.1 x 0.5 x 0.3 in. Net weight: 18 g / 0.7 oz. Product Description The C 411 condenser acoustic pickup with its tailored frequency response is ideal for acoustic guitar, mandolin, violin and most other stringed instruments. Placing the small ultra-light C 411 on or near the bridge will reproduce a clear and uncolored sound without changing the balance of the instrument. Attaching the C 411 is easy with the included non-marring reusable adhesive compound. The C 411 is the stethoscope for your acoustic instruments. Polar pattern: figure 8 (vibration pickup, Frequency range: 10-18,000 Hz, Sensitivity: 1 mV/ms2 (vibration pickup), Max. SPL for 1 % THD: approx. 100 dB SPL,impedance: 200 Ohms unbalanced. 9 to 52 volts phantom power or battery powering from B 29 L or AKG bodypack transmitters, Connector: C 411: 3-pin male XLR; Cable length: 3 m (10 ft.), Finish: matte black. Size: 27 x 14 x 9.5 mm (1 x 0.5 x 0.3 in.), Net/shipping weight: 18 /225 g (0.3/7.9 oz.). Standard accessories: adhesive compound. Optional accessories: for C 411 L: B 29 L battery power supply, MPA III L MicroMic phantom power adapter.
  14. Hi Manfio, They look excellent and again, I reaffirm what others have already mentioned in previous threads that your work is very, very clean. It shows your keen attention to even the smallest details. I especially like your varnish work I am glad you tend to concentrate on violas as I think they are very much under-appreciated when compared to violins and cellos. By the way, I noticed you used Evahs for the G, D and A string but am at a loss at identifying your E string. What did you use? Alejandro
  15. Very nice work (and photos) Joseph. Very interesting back pattern too