Mat Roop

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About Mat Roop

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    http://www.rezx.biz
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    Male
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    Wyoming, Ontario, Canada

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  1. Hi Davide... curious about why you make tall saddles? Do you adhere to the "standard" 158 degree string angle over the bridge?
  2. Hi Philip, could you also take a closeup pic of the fingergrip winding at the forward end from the hair side of the stick...I'm interested to see the the finish of the ending of the silver wire. Looking forward to more pics!... Mat
  3. Ok... so what is the ideal saddle shape?... assuming a standard strad style arching height? I've never really gave it much thought, but my habit has been : From the end view of the saddle I have always made the peak at the center of the saddle body .... or should it be forward or rearward?... by how much? As far as the curve that the tailwire follows, is concerned, I match the saddle to the edge of the top and then flow it smoothly to the peak, and pointing a touch above the line of the after length strings Thoughts?? ... Cheers, Mat PS... re glueing saddles... clean close fit & glue with hand pressure 1 minute... no preheat
  4. I just hang a standard 12" desk fan set at high speed in the shop window opening blowing outward. This prevents fumes from entering the rest of the house. ... Might be a problem in winter at -20 deg F Cheers... Mat
  5. http://darntonviolins.com/personal-billboard-some-labels-are-better-than/
  6. So I posed my earlier question to Optima with the following response.... cheers, Mat Dear Mat, well, the diameter has an effect for the tension and the flexibility of the strings. So thinner strings are easier to play, but are a bit warmer and not so loud. Thicker strings need a bit more power, but sound louder and more brilliant. Mit freundlichen Grüßen / Sincerely André Schneider Vice President
  7. I've only stripped a violin once 20 years ago... never again!... and I would never use a scraper to clean it up... Violin wood esp top plates is not smooth, and it is essential that the patina of the wood remain intact if you don't want a total disaster. Cheers... Mat
  8. If you are a pro, you charge for your skill and knowledge ... If not, you charge for your time.
  9. Thanks everyone... I ordered a few of each version including the Gold .... looking forward to some exploration!... Cheers!... Mat
  10. Thanks Jacob... I really appreciate your advice! Another question... as I dig into it further I see there are 3 thicknesses available... .26 .27 & .28 mm... Is there a tonal difference or is it mainly playing characteristics that differ with the diameter? Which one do you use & why? Thanks, Mat
  11. so my supplier carries 4 versions of the Lenzner Gold Brokat ... standard steel, premium steel, premium brassed and 24Kt gold. Which is the one generally recommended and which you buy in bulk? http://counterpointmusic.ca/product-category/strings/violin-strings/optima-goldbrokat-violin-strings/
  12. thanks Bill... one question they don't answer... How do you know if an old chisel has been overheated by a rough grinding/er if it does not show the blued color? If it has been overheated, what is the solution Cheers... Mat
  13. Yes, but you would need real good vacuum control, otherwise you could easily create more splits or even collapse an instrument.... worth pondering! For some time I have had the idea of doing something akin to what is done to fill and seal auto windshield stone chips... Create a vacuum then release filler into vacuum. But can't get my head around the how of the mechanics to doing it on an assembled violin.
  14. For sure, but once you have it figured out... bob's your uncle! ...cheers, minimalist Mat Thanks fiddle collector... great article, and helpful! ... Mat
  15. Jim...You are right... The problem I had was that the usual cobalt blue indicator beads are toxic if you try to dry them out either in a regular oven or microwave. This orange one turns to deep green when saturated, and contains no toxic materials so drying it out for reuse is safe. The reason to put Ice cubes in the microwave is simply out of an abundance of caution, as I would not want anyone to burn out their microwave oven if they leave it on too long ... but, without ice cubes, the moisture boils out real quick.