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quarter_note

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  1. Ugh, I've given the wrong impression. My writing skills must need some serious help. I don't have any intention of quitting any time soon. I've taken lessons for a few years now and I love them. I work hard for my own enjoyment and to please my teacher. Music has been one of my few constants, my sanity's anchor really, during some rather confusing and transitional years. That's why I was puzzled when someone expressed surprise that I hadn't quit. Regarding trying new things - I didn't really mean dabbling in different things with the intention of keeping some and quitting others. When kids sign up for a few lessons, everyone seems fine. Yet when I as an adult do that, people seem to think there's something strange about it. The attitude seems to be, "It's normal for kids to take these classes, but why would an adult do it? It's too late for you to be any good. So why try?" I have to say, it stings to be classified as a person who will "probably quit after a year or two and just mess around on their own" after spending hours and hours dedicated to practice. ...Maybe I should take a writing course next.
  2. I agree with the last statement - But what's wrong with doing that when you're an adult? (Assuming you keep up with your other life obligations, obviously.) I don't really see how I'm equipped to know what different musical instruments, forms of dance, etc. will be like unless I try it either. Perhaps I am not approaching the situation with a mature attitude - When I was little, I had very limited opportunities to try new things. Suddenly the opportunities are there and maybe I'm jumping on them with childlike enthusiasm. Try things out while you can, you know?
  3. Fortunately, it was not my dear mom who made that comment . I've played another instrument for about 20 years so she knows I've got some staying power . People make strange comments all the time though. I've been asked (more than once) to skip my lesson or cancel on absurdly short notice for no good reason. I wonder why they don't consider how rude it is to my teacher? I've also had people mock music that I've been listening to. Whether or not these people are "worth" knowing, I do know them and have to deal with them. They often get the message if I calmly say, "That's disrespectful". But anyway, one of my friends who quit as a kid/teen did so for the oddest reason: He finished the RCM Grade 10 exam. The attitude was, "I finished all the levels so now I'm done." This one is almost incomprehensible to me. Didn't you do all the levels so you would be free to play whatever you pleased??? Ah well, it's our differences that make this an interesting world.
  4. I had the most curious conversation with someone the other day - I mentioned something about my violin lessons, the other person said, "I'm surprised you haven't quit yet." I was taken aback by this comment. Although I don't talk about my lessons very often, I'm very positive about them. I asked what prompted the comment. I was told that most adults would quit after a couple of years because of other responsibilities and demands on time. Just wondering - Does anyone know if there's any truth to this statement? Do most adult students really bail within the first few years? And if so, do they really quit more frequently than younger students? Seems to me that I have more friends who "quit" instruments than who "play" instruments. (Since I'm relatively young, these people would all have quit when they were children.)
  5. Thank you very much for the advice! Making a thorough plan with my teacher, memorizing, strengthening my position work, recording myself and putting the violin parts together with a piano all sound like great ideas. I might have trouble finding a pianist but I can always record myself playing the piano part if need be. I had considered taking lessons with another teacher for a few weeks because I understand the value - Keeping my progress on track, preventing mistakes from becoming ingrained and giving me a fresh perspective. There are a couple of reasons for preferring to work by myself for the time being, but I think I'll keep the alternate-teacher option open. Perhaps I can ask for some recommendations for another teacher in case I run into problems. I know that it is difficult to say anything specific since you have never heard me play before. (I could tell you I play pieces listed as RCM grades 6 and 7 but that contains little to no information about the quality of my playing.) So thank you for your help!
  6. I’m posting on this site with the hopes of obtaining some advice. First some background: I have wanted to play classical violin since I was quite small. However, being a shy little kid, I never voiced my desire. I participated in school music programs quietly hoping for, but never receiving, a chance to play a violin. A couple of years ago, I decided I had waited long enough and started lessons as an adult. I knew I would never be a career musician but that was never the goal. I wanted to play out of simple love for the instrument and its beautiful, unique voice. I found a teacher right away and have studied with this same person since. This teacher is wonderful – So encouraging and inspiring and even working on scales and studies is a joy. This wonderful teacher of mine will be out of town for few months in the near future. My question relates to practicing during this down time. I could look for another teacher but I am thinking of experimenting by myself instead. I don’t intend to learn new material (for fear of introducing bad habits) but rather I am considering revisiting my old music. Maybe experiment with different interpretations and focus more on the musicality than I did on the first pass. My teacher is ok with either decision. I am curious to know if any of you experienced musicians think there is any particular disadvantage to experimenting with my old pieces on my own. If there is no disadvantage, can anyone offer me any advice on practicing on my own? My teacher has given me a few tips already but I would love to hear more suggestions. To other teachers out there – What would you most like to hear out of your students after you have been away?
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