Melvin Goldsmith

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Everything posted by Melvin Goldsmith

  1. Whatever gets the job done faster...we can't charge our clients for us being anally retentive re sharpening. Tormek is too slow for cutting back. I use a CBN grinder for that for primary bevel. Secondary bevel Tormek finish on diamond plates or oil stones Washita and Arkansas and final buff on Tormek
  2. You don't need graphite or chalk to fit a bar. It's not going to tell you anything you can't already see. You can see all aspects of the joint and the gluing area is big.
  3. Yes and no. I make varnishes for the different layers in different ways. Generally I will pre treat my oil and resins and combine with minimal heat or no heat. Heating oil reduces it's brushing time and add's no color so I prefer to keep the oil ratio low and the brushability high.
  4. Basically by heating the resin and oil together you made some kind of plastic that is insoluble in turpentine. It's a complete myth that resin and oil have to be heated together for hours to form some kind of magical bond. For centuries artists have been combining these mediums cold to make glazes with a view to proven longevity.
  5. How long does it take to make a really good violin.....about 40 years experience I would say...similar for surgeon. You need to wind your neck in
  6. I bought in a couple of corene ones to try. ..First impression was a chemical smell, The playing surface seems almost ready to go but they seemed so acoustically dead compared to Ebony that I was scared to progress, . It's a near perfect board saving 2 hours, However colleagues tell a lot about these coming unglued plus it seems acoustically dead....I am looking for every small percentage of gain....I think these could be a slight gain for me in work time but not for my customer so they go in the bin
  7. Yeh...me too...I don't stamp because I think it just looks utterly vulgar. I put my ID and the date under the arch out of sight
  8. I know there is a preference for sub .38. I like plus 42 at least
  9. One piece backs are generally The left over cuts from cello backs
  10. Not smooth but certainly shiny. I think age quite quickly took the shine off the pristine examples we see ( Messie is heavily French polished)
  11. What makes you think old Cremonese instruments were not shiny when new....I bet they were! Most 'antiqued' making I see these days seems to be influenced by what other antiquing makers are doing rather than observations of old instruments held in the hand.
  12. You don't need pigments...if you use them for my varnish a tiny addition will make a big difference...pic is all cooked in colour
  13. I tend to agree with Martin and Don but I generally go higher than standard with string heights at the nut and less scoop in the board. You want to make the nut accurate but no sharp edges for the left hand to notice
  14. I've seen all kind of experiments with tuning a bridge......generally the bridges used were not good. When I hear luthiers talking about tuning violin parts I kind of tune out. Tuning needs to be left to the musicians...wood moves with the climate......just out of tune sounds awful.
  15. You can take the back well over 5mm.. no problem. If I see a DG model violin with less than 6 I get disapointed
  16. Miracles can of course occur if one takes ones instrument to a charismatic high reputation adjuster. They might not need to move the post at all in reality to have a profound effect.
  17. I bow to your sound tech background and kind of agree with what you say. One thing that has always had me thinking was a classical guitar maker who told me his theory that an audience would expand their ears to hear a quieter beautiful tone and withdraw their ears from an aggressive loud tone
  18. I don't insist on doing the work myself but If I can't do the post adjustment I want it done by a colleague I can trust and work with. ie not the latest Svengali adjuster to be harassing the orchestra or No3 Viola who is compulsively handy with a soundpost adjuster and has nearly made his first viola. SO much damage can be done.
  19. Most sound post adjustments involve dragging the poor thing around and scuffing the surface of the belly from one poor position to another to find the least worst. On instruments I have made or worked on all warranty is invalidated if the post is tinkered with without my approval
  20. The sound and projection are very good in the opinion of my customer and myself and we have both decent hands on experience of great del Gesu violins. These days I don't gradate a violin until the varnish is fully cured ( I leave everything over 1mm thicker than required) and I will take a violin apart a few times and regradate if needed. This allows me to experiment and take risks. I am not trying to make the perfect violin straight away...I make a violin to the best of my abilities and then I act like a restorer and set up guy to improve it from there. I have no interest in how a new instrument sounds until it has been strung up and played or mechanically stimulated for at least 3 months or so and all the tensions settle in and the wood moves and longer posts are needed and neck angles re set etc. Heavily wooded instruments need time to settle in