Melvin Goldsmith

Members
  • Content Count

    4869
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    6

3 Followers

About Melvin Goldsmith

  • Rank
    Enthusiast

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.goldsmithviolins.com
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Montacute

Recent Profile Visitors

25700 profile views
  1. 55418847_1221821314650347_8463162653664083968_n.mp4 hopefully some kind of video from my phone
  2. Picture above showing back. It is deliberately very dramatic and left field. the red varnish sits on a thick colorless base coat and is delicate breaking off leaving a thick edge
  3. Joining two pieces of wood together is elementary wood working It's a 5 minute or less job in the trade. I'd suggest going to a proper woodworkers forum for advice on it
  4. That's kind of you Mike. Thanks. A couple of pics of a violin I am antiquing right now. Beside the FB the wear is deep into the wood and is showing black.
  5. These pictures are not good quality in the lighting and photography...I know the instrument...it is barely recognizable in these pictures.
  6. It's hardly recognizable in the photos compared to how it looks in the display case. The intense red color varnish is really washed out in these pics due to the way it is lit and shot. Still useful pics but the violin color is much better illustrated in the Strad poster and Brandmair varnish book as well as the Oxford Strad exhibition catalogue.
  7. Dear Dimitri, You are a great master of your trade and if I was commissioning a case from you ( as I would wish one day!) I would be asking your advice and not ever dictating materials. You can furnish the most exquisite natural cloths but your client asks for some unproven cheap synthetic flammable polyester that will probably degrade much faster than the natural fibers you know and trust. In your position I would simply reject the commission. The customer is not showing you the respect you deserve.
  8. Bridges bend because they are poor wood, not cut right or not maintained correctly by the player. Wood is a major factor. If you look at great old long lived Hill bridges etc they are very hard and have very tight growth of about 0.3mm per year and not much medullary ray to show. Most modern suppliers focus more on spectalular rays than good hardness and texture resulting in so called top grade blanks being mainly rubbish If I come across a great old bridge that has done great service but has come out of adjustment I will try to restore it and keep it going rather than making a new one
  9. Martin Knows his stuff...I doubt you do