Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

PhilipG

Members
  • Posts

    324
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by PhilipG

  1. I remember inquiring some time ago about how a seller would be shipping a violin. I hadn't placed a bid yet but for some reason, I felt the need to ask. Perhaps it was the way it was stated in the auction description and it made me concerned. The answer I got astounded me. "It will be shipped inside the case". "What? You mean you'll put it inside the case and then inside a cardboard box full of packing materials?" "No, it will be shipped inside its case". Looking at the case, it was an old shaped junker that had no locks on it at all, just the snap hinges. I can only imagine what would have arrived to the winning bidder. Either a totally smashed up violin or an empty case with a label taped on the outside, the violin having been removed or fallen out along the way.
  2. With the exception of very few sellers, buying a violin on eBay is nothing but chance.
  3. That's a great link also and thank you. I would probably use Power Point, though. With that software, picture boxes and text boxes are automatically created when you copy/paste and then you can easily move the boxes where you want them. You also have a greater versatility in enlarging each box and or reducing it. I am going to save both sites to my bookmarks.
  4. You can still view the catalogs by scrolling down for each page. The pictures though, are a bit small that way. There are some beautiful instruments pictured there.
  5. I did a Google search on "Email Appraisals". There are a lot of them out there. I doubt if any of them are going to pass up a quick $40.00 by telling you your item is a fake. Especially if they have their disclaimer protecting them.
  6. I agree with you. But again, $42,000 is still a high enough amount that either someone knows exactly what they are/were doing, or is a fool. I can't imagine someone having no recourse but to leave bad feedback for a bad purchase that they made on their own, with no one to blame but themselves.
  7. Is it possible that the seller canceled the bid for $95,000 to see what the next highest bid was? If this is true, then it's more likely an auction that had at least one shill bidder. I mean, $95,000 as a bid would have certainly overshadowed every other bid and would have then displayed what everyone else was bidding. Remember, when someone bids higher than the previous bidder, the previous bidder's highest amount is then displayed.
  8. Sorry, but I sense scam all the way. Maybe the gold coins are worth their weight in gold but if so, why sell them on eBay? They'll easily trade for what they're worth to any reputable dealer. And the paintings as well. My guess is the paintings are phonies and the rest of the items, with few exceptions, are modern copies. They're fakes if intentionally sold as real. As for the appraisers, here's one of the ones used. Here's their website: http://www.hiddenfortune.com/ The other appraiser is similar as well, requiring only a picture sent to them (emailed) and a $40.00 fee. Then they send you an official appraisal. Probably by email as well which you can then print out on your home printer. Neat racket. Kind of like the old "Send us your last name and $10.00 and we'll send you your coat of arms". I can't believe someone spent $42,000 on this auction. Remember, if something seems too good to be true, it usually is. I'm glad I'm poor. I can't afford to make mistakes.
  9. Much better than my original link and thank you. Very nice and I'm glad the applause was included in the video. I saw also the tightness of her bow, which was pointed out earlier and what appears to be a slightly higher action of the strings. Probably slightly higher at the nut rather than at the bridge alone. I'm sure it's a style she has perfected for herself over the years.
  10. Here it is again. Almost all his instruments look the same. Different labels but they all look so similar; same color lacquer even. Even with my untrained eye I am now able to spot his "different" instruments even from the thumbnail picture: http://cgi.ebay.com/Old-Vintage-Violin-by-...=item4a9d58bc86
  11. I had a feeling that the price for one of his instruments was going to cost that much. Obviously, it's way out of my price range. Still, with an ability to restore instruments, I can at least hope that I will come across something much better than what I have now, that others would pass up simply being in an unplayable condition.
  12. I looked on Wikipedia and found that she does own those two Strads; the ones listed here and also a modern instrument built by Roberto Regazzi, who I now will be researching also. I wonder what he charges. I'm sure she owns several other fine instruments but these were the only ones listed. I also read that she never uses a shoulder rest. I can really get lost on youtube watching all these performances. Thank goodness for vacation time and rainy days. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne-Sophie_Mutter
  13. It is very beautiful and I'm lucky enough to be able to listen to it with some old Polk speakers. I also like the Korngold Concertos which you can also find on youtube. I wonder who built her violin.
  14. One bow I got is really pretty neat with some markings on it that I have never seen before. I believe it is pernambuco and worth restoring. It has a nice feel and weight to it as well. You never know what you are going to get with along with the old 'fiddle' you buy.
  15. I was thinking that the bows had something to do with it also. I should look at the bows I have collected over the years from the instruments I have purchased, where they were simply included in the sale. Many times they weren't even initially pictured in the auction.
  16. Just to share something. If I really want something bad enough, when I am bidding (at the last second) I find it difficult to keep my hands steady. I can feel my heartbeat intensifying, my breathing becoming labored and I think I get tunnel vision. It is indeed an adrenaline rush. Yes, I admit, I do snipe. It's really to save money. I mean, I tried initially bidding my maximum too many times, only to witness some "zero" or shill nibbling away till they got just below my maximum bid. I think this is the reason why everyone snipes at the last second.
  17. But again, what do I know? Just curious as to what the experts here think. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...e=STRK:MEWAX:IT
  18. Funny, I got this from the seller: PLEASE DO NOT BID,EBAY WILL NOT LET ME ADD VERY IMPORTANT INFORMATION TO THE LISTING SO I FEEL I SHOULD RE-LIST THE VIOLIN ,I APOLOGIZE TO ALL ,NO SCAM JUST WANT TO BE HONEST AND FAIR TO EVERYONE .AGAIN PLEASE ACCEPT MY APOLOGIES AND CHECK BACK AGAIN FOR THE NEW DESCRIPTION/LISTING COMING SOON WITH MORE ACCURATE INFORMATION AND BETTER PICTURES. THANKS, JBD I guess a number of us were interested in it. I didn't bid, though. I was simply asking the seller if it was a full sized instrument.
  19. I've actually done this before. I have a Maggini copy that was almost totally apart and needed a lower rib. I found an almost exact match in an extremely cheap instrument that was also falling apart and simply transferred it to the Maggini. I had to sand each end slightly but it fit. I now have a complete instrument and it sounds fine. If I ever decide to sell it, I will certainly explain to any potential buyer the replaced section but it's now a complete and playable instrument. At any rate, I also tend to think that this is too much money for this type of project. From the relisting, I tend to think that the original buyer had second thoughts.
  20. Thanks. I'll watch this one. I want to see if the price goes over the cost of shipping. Actually, such projects are always intriguing to me. To be able to take a violin in total disarray and put it back into playing condition, has always been extremely rewarding. But again, after doing this a number of times, and for all the time it takes to do it, I want to make sure it's worth it.
  21. ...."Also, the "I" and "you" regarding the skills part is a rhetorical I and you, and not directed toward anyone in particular. We've all jumped in over out heads before....." No problem, I understood this from the onset of your post, and I agree. Actually, I do have the skills to repair something like this but in all honesty, I still lack the expertise in identifying any particular instrument as being worth whatever money I have. Or worth the time it would take to restore and get into playing condition. I'm certainly above the quality vs. junk level but then again, I still am a bit fearful of dropping any money into a project that might actually be worth less after I restore it. Believe it or not, this has happened in the past. It's how I learned about that old line, "Time is money". Anyway, there are is a separate and distinct market for both complete violins in playing condition on eBay and instruments that need total and absolute restoration. There is still a matter of a lower rib missing from this instrument.
  22. I'm wondering if I passed up a great deal here. It's not so much money but more than I thought would be spent on this type of project. It's going to require a great of work at any rate. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...e=STRK:MEWAX:IT
  23. I had forgotten that and it might certainly be a factor in whether anyone bids, but I also caught this: "Buyer must have it's own authenticator". This may be a good idea as there simply may not be any violin experts in Pocatello, Idaho. As usual, I am going to monitor this auction to see what, if any, questions or even challenges the seller is going to get. Or post.
  24. Even my girlfriend, who knows very little about violins, had to laugh at this one. http://cgi.ebay.com/Old-Antique-Violine-An...=item4a9c9bfae5 I always look for the bargains on eBay, or the very interesting instruments. It can get to be a chore, though, thumbing through countless auctions, asking the seller questions, doing addition research, etc. But occasionally, there is something to laugh about.
×
×
  • Create New...