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A. Brown

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Everything posted by A. Brown

  1. Source for believing PK had at least one student: http://www.maestronet.com/moennig/Overview.html Moennig
  2. Hello Dave, Call 206-526-5542 and ask to speak with David Stone. His violin shop is at 5629 University Way N.E. Seattle, WA 98105 He's seen a number of them and can tell you about branding vs. labels etc. PK did have students. AB
  3. "German wood is better able to vibrate" Bill, what do you mean by this? A. Brown
  4. For the better teachers in town (Seattle area) one can pay upwards from $75/hour, and from lesser teachers and UW grad students $30/half-hour. I just heard from my daughter at Oberlin that Michel Debost (flute) charges $200/hour for a lesson outside the conservatory. He is coaching her ensemble. A. Brown
  5. Hello, Use the search feature of this site on the words "old dog" and you will get lots of encouragement. AB
  6. Hello Fred, If your lesson is only a half-hour, you have a limited time to cover the territory. If you can afford it, take a longer lesson where there will be time. If the teacher doesn't want to do this, you at least need to have a talk and discuss your need for more help in this area. Part of learning any instrument is learning the basics of counting and music theory, and it is time well spent. Is your teacher tightly focused on violin rather than on the whole of music? You say you need: "to become more rhythmic" If you mean steadiness, the only way you can acquire this is to do as your teacher says. Rarely play without your metronome except at your lesson. If you mean understanding subdivision, do some clapping at home. A good teacher will give you a variety of techniques to use with the metronome. A good teacher will also point out exactly where you have gone wrong when you are counting incorrectly and drill you until you know how to start practicing it right. A good teacher might not get through much music in a half-hour. A half-hour is just fine for kids at a beginning level, but it may not be enought for many adults because we ask a lot of questions and expect to "understand" what is going on. Good luck, and don't give up. A. Brown
  7. Hello Angela, This topic has had a lot of discussion. Use the "search" feature to review it. Try "start age" "begin age" and so on. A. Brown
  8. Hello Michael, I used the 0000 steel wool. I've decided not to take off the varnish. The top crennelation is lesser now, but c'est la vie. Thanks for the help. I had borrowed a color from an artist friend, and it must have had gunk in it even though I read the label and thought it was OK. I won't try that brand ever again. The good thing is that I get to make another trip to Daniel Smith's. Ann Brown : Try 0000 steel wool, then make sure you get it ALL off! Don't feel like you have to get off every last zit, or you'll go too far. : If you heat your varnish up to thin it out then maybe you can filter it so this won't happen next time. : : Hello, : : Well, on the violin I'm varnishing, in the most recent coat of oil varnish I have a problem. This is not the final coat. The varnish in the jar has become contaminated with some sort of dirt and fuzz. The result is that the violin has a coat that is now furry in some places. It isn't acceptable. : : I think I have two choices. First is to rub it out with micromesh. The problem with this is that I have some nice ridging on the top that I do not want to lose. The other option is to wipe all the varnish off and start over. Will the rubbing out the fuzz take down the ridges, or should I start again? : : A. Brown :
  9. Hello, Well, on the violin I'm varnishing, in the most recent coat of oil varnish I have a problem. This is not the final coat. The varnish in the jar has become contaminated with some sort of dirt and fuzz. The result is that the violin has a coat that is now furry in some places. It isn't acceptable. I think I have two choices. First is to rub it out with micromesh. The problem with this is that I have some nice ridging on the top that I do not want to lose. The other option is to wipe all the varnish off and start over. Will the rubbing out the fuzz take down the ridges, or should I start again? A. Brown
  10. Hello, I'm a viola-mom too. Some of these violas come through my local shop, and they are very fine instruments and very attractive looking. The shop corrects problems in them and sets them up, which may take a bit of time. I also know that my local shop carefully examins these instruments when they arrive, and they do not accept every instrument for sale. So the ones seen here are specially selected and carefully set up. This maximizes the quality seen in that particular shop. If the viola offered to you has gone through this gamut, and the professionals are satisfied with its design and "feel," then you probably won't find a much better viola for that price. Make sure the shop will deal with any flaws that develop in the wood. A. Brown
  11. Each Man Has A Name by Zelda Each man has a name given him by God and given him by his father and mother. Each man has a name given him by his stature and his way of smiling and given him by his clothes. Each man has a name given him by the mountains and given him by his walls. Each man has a name given him by the planets and given him by his neighbors. Each man has a name given him by his sins and given him by his longing. Each man has a name given him by his enemies and given him by his love. Each man has a name given him by his feast days and given him by his craft. Each man has a name given him by the seasons of the year and given him by his blindness. Each man has a name given him by the sea and given him by his death.
  12. Hello *fake name*, At least Mark T left his "mark" unlike yourself. Can you humor us with a more original handel? AB
  13. : : Bass bars usually wear out at about the same time that the luthier needs to make a boat payment :-) : : : : : : Do bassbars weaken over time and need replacing? I have read that they do, but I suspect the real reason they need replacing is because the top dries out over time and requires a heavier bassbar to compensate?
  14. : Bass bars usually wear out at about the same time that the luthier needs to make a boat payment :-) : : : Do bassbars weaken over time and need replacing? I have read that they do, but I suspect the real reason they need replacing is because the top dries out over time and requires a heavier bassbar to compensate?
  15. How unabashedly METAPHORICALLY male that one can't have an interesting time unless one is either bashing or gettin bashed. AB
  16. Hello MarkT, I've been observing this board for a couple of years now, and have watched it progress from a fairly personable and interesting forum into a board with a lot of readers who discourage any ruckus or heated opinions and any personal stances on debatable subjects. The result is a lot of the board's former resources simply lurk instead of contribute. Now you want to eliminate humor too? I see Fidicen's reply as humorous but I do NOT see yours as such. Fidicen certainly did have something to say, and I enjoyed it. A. Brown
  17. Hello, First of all I don't play violin or viola, so feel free to disregard whatever I say. My daughter went to viola from violin but played them together for three years. She took it as a challenge to learn to easily make the switch from one to the other. People had told her it was difficult, so she set out to make it "her thing." She plays mostly viola now. It's sort of like eating jalapenos: you have to like them and you have to be used to them, and it has good shock value. Roberto Diaz, principal viola in the Philadelphia Orchestra, plays a 16-inch viola and certainly gets a big enough sound. A. Brown
  18. Hello, What was happening in Markneukirchen to the instrument industry there? A. Brown
  19. Hello Katie, Drop back to the orchestra's level by taking up viola and cello. Develop a trio and coach it (teach it.) Play it at a concert and/or solo & ensemble contest. Offer to hold sectionals for all sections. Do you play keyboard? If you are playing Baroque music, learn to play BC with your orchestra. You may not have a harpsichord, but you might get an electronic keyboard that sounds acceptable. Offer to sort out the school's music library. If nothing else, treat this as a learning experience for something other than technical musical advancement. Keep contempt totally OUT of it. Sorry for this lecture if that's what it seems like. A. Brown
  20. Hello Jon, You didn't offend me. You're not a loser. You'll get educated on these things. A label is just that: only a label. We are pretty proud of our daughter, too. Ann Brown : Alas, it is true. Would that I could help it, but it was fate that sent me into America in the latter 20th century so I am doomed to be a loser and many other things of such nature.
  21. She's at OC Con., W of Cleveland, studying with R. V. She was accepted at C but didn't choose to go there. AB
  22. She's at OC Con., W of Cleveland, studying with R. V. She was accepted at C but didn't choose to go there. AB
  23. Hello Jon, Please, this violin is DEFINITELY NOT an Amati. The best that could be said for its origins is that it is French or German and from the previous century. I don't really care; it is a family heirloom that is enjoyed by us. The worst that can be said about it is that it has been in the past badly repaired with the wrong kinds of glue, probably by Uncle Charlie himself. Regardless, it isn't an investment and will be given away to the next generation rather than ever sold. There is no need to gather any more opinions. In fact, it's a sort of private family joke that a certain well-published amatuer my husband knows has called it a Cremona violin, which it IS NOT. Another thing: did we own an Amati or Strad or del Gesu, we would never advertise nor broadcast it. Can you imagine the insurance and security hassles? It'd be better to keep it anonymously and enjoy it more. If I want a certificate, I'd BUY an instrument that already has one. In our family we are often guilty of reverse snobbery, so I will have to brag (I haven't bragged here lately: I've been very good:-) that my daughter successfully auditioned herself into a world class conservatory studio on a $2300 viola with a $675 bow. She uses these items by choice because they do for her a superior job. She had option to spend ten times that amount. I think if and when the time ever comes that she outplays the instrument, she will know it and also know what she wants to be different. In fiddles, most everything is subjective. After all, in a luthier's business, lots of things can be "fiddles" if one doesn't watch out! I appologize in advance to those shops that don't "fiddle." How much better to have an anonymous or unknown or innocuous fiddle that plays up a storm than to have a famous expensive fiddle with canine or feline tendencies, although I am sure there are some good violins among the expensive ones. The man who made my daughter's viola is proud of it. Actually, he has TWO viola students in this studio who use his instruments. A low price doesn't mean low quality. He has what they call "hot hands," and there is a waiting list for his production. (I think he might have raised his prices a couple of hundred dollars since 1995.) A. Brown
  24. Just about any French post-Romantic organ piece would fit the bill for horror music. (Hee hee.)
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