Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Bobby

Members
  • Posts

    22
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Bobby's Achievements

Junior Member

Junior Member (2/5)

  1. : hi. I'm back, adn I'm complaining aobut my teacher again. This time, she decided that we cna't play any pieces that aren't in the key of d major or c major. It is just driving me nuts that she doesn't realise that an 8th grade orchestra is capable of playing keys other than the easiest two!!!! Hi Katie, If you are frustrated with your school orchestra, why not look into joining a community orchestra or a youth orchestra? I really looked forward to being in my school orchestra until I finally got there and could play miles beyond my teacher. Then it was an exercise in total frustration. Even though my mom suggested I use it as an opportunity to learn the viola clef, I soon realized that the teacher didn't even know how to read the viola clef. I know that there are lots of great orchestra teachers out there, but there are some school districts (such as mine) where the people doing the hiring have no clue as to what they are doing. So it may be that you have had the bad luck to land with an incompetent teacher. In which case, orchestra at school may be a waste of time for you. I joined a community youth orchestra when I was about 9 or 10 and stayed with them for a couple of years -- it wasn't real challenging, but the director was good and I learned a whole lot more than I ever would have with the school. Now I'm in a really top youth symphony and it is really exciting playing with them. Playing with the school orchestra, though, would have done nothing to prepare me for the youth symphony. Bobby
  2. : how much do street performers make? like... lets say... a trio of 2 violins and a cello playing on a busy street of Laguna Beach... i was thinking of doing that... seems like it'd be much fun =) and get some extra money too. Well, 2 of my friends on a trip to California stayed to visit relatives, I think in LA and went out on the street and played a couple of days for a few hours each day and earned $500. One of them is about 15 and I think the other is 12 or 13.
  3. : Hi. : I love both. I like the wonderful sound of a symphony behind and around me. But I also love the great sound that gomes from my violin playing solo. : Ben Hi Ben, What orchestra have you been playing in? Bobby
  4. We bought a blue Korg Metronome which retails for between $45 and $50 because my mother says I don't listen very well to the beat of my old Seiko metronome. The Korg was about the loudest one we could find although the Dr. Beat is pretty good, too.
  5. : But surely if the rest of the world is so bent on nothing more than flashy technique and not paying much attention to artistic creativity, we should all the more be striving to put it right?! Surely we should be trying even harder to show people the great value of artistic creativity, and trying to show them that flashy technique isn't everything?! : As I said in one of the other messages I posted, I'm a bit more technical than I am musical, and I'm desperately trying to develop and increase my musicality, because after a while, sheer technique gets a bit dull. . . Well, you know, with the musicality issue, it seems to me that although I can play musically with the music, it is when it is memorized and internalized that I really can focus on the way I want it shaped. I practice with my music much of the time -- at least when I am woodshedding, but even so it is memorized. In fact, the first step of woodshedding a difficult part for me is to memorize it. However, it is having it memorized that frees me up to become more musical. And, it is the Suzuki training which has endowed me with the ability to memorize very very quickly.
  6. : i agree that it is easier to play when you've heard the music. but when you're in the real world, recordings are not aways available! imagine if you're doing a premiere. woops! you're caught! Sure, we should make use of what's available- all the fine recordings, but we shouldn't reply on listening to the music first before you learn the piece all the time. : The thing is, people give so much emphaise on the ability to play by ear. Sure it is a admirable and valueable skill, but i don't think one should solely rely on it to learn music. : reading notes comes hand in hand with music and playing an instrument. : : - There may be some who are ashamed of admitting they studied Suzuki method. Well, I'm ashamed that with my traditional training, I can't learn simple 1st position fiddle tunes, about equal to Suzuki Book 1 tunes, without a LOT of mental effort! (just the notes, never mind all the ornaments) However, am working on it! :-) : if you can't learn simple tunes equal to suzuki book 1 without lots of mental effort, then you should ask yourself what the problem is. Is it because you haven't heard the tune in one of _those_ suzuki recordings? or is it you're just not strong in reading music? : we must remember that in the real world, sight reading is really important and recordings are not always available! I really don't think most of the posters on this board have a clear picture of what Suzuki students taught correctly can do. I am out of the books and sometimes listen to recordings -- usually several -- of pieces I am learning. Sometimes there isn't time, but it certainly doesn't hold me back. My friends and I learned a piece by Suk recently for a workshop and none of us had a recording, but it wasn't a problem. Some of us only had a couple days to learn the piece -- it was by Suk. The point is, that all of us are Suzuki students and we have all developed pretty decent sight reading skills -- which are probably made better by all of the ear training. I had the piece memorized within a couple of days of picking it up. From all my years of listening to the Suzuki recordings and because my teacher had me do a special listening assignment each week, my ears are now pretty fine-tuned. If I am struggling with fingerings and bowings in a new piece, I try to get hold of several recordings and listen to how others do it. Because of all my Suzuki ear training, I can hear what string something is on and what position and for bowings I can tell what to do. It's a big help. Sometimes, too, I get musical ideas. However, my teacher suggested that I listen to as many recordings as I can and that I can tell what I like and don't like about ways different performers play something. I don't need to copy, though, but it never hurts to listen to what others are doing. However, I don't have to have a recording to learn a piece.
  7. : i agree that it is easier to play when you've heard the music. but when you're in the real world, recordings are not aways available! imagine if you're doing a premiere. woops! you're caught! Sure, we should make use of what's available- all the fine recordings, but we shouldn't reply on listening to the music first before you learn the piece all the time. : The thing is, people give so much emphaise on the ability to play by ear. Sure it is a admirable and valueable skill, but i don't think one should solely rely on it to learn music. : reading notes comes hand in hand with music and playing an instrument. : : - There may be some who are ashamed of admitting they studied Suzuki method. Well, I'm ashamed that with my traditional training, I can't learn simple 1st position fiddle tunes, about equal to Suzuki Book 1 tunes, without a LOT of mental effort! (just the notes, never mind all the ornaments) However, am working on it! :-) : if you can't learn simple tunes equal to suzuki book 1 without lots of mental effort, then you should ask yourself what the problem is. Is it because you haven't heard the tune in one of _those_ suzuki recordings? or is it you're just not strong in reading music? : we must remember that in the real world, sight reading is really important and recordings are not always available! I really don't think most of the posters on this board have a clear picture of what Suzuki students taught correctly can do. I am out of the books and sometimes listen to recordings -- usually several -- of pieces I am learning. Sometimes there isn't time, but it certainly doesn't hold me back. My friends and I learned a piece by Suk recently for a workshop and none of us had a recording, but it wasn't a problem. Some of us only had a couple days to learn the piece -- it was by Suk. The point is, that all of us are Suzuki students and we have all developed pretty decent sight reading skills -- which are probably made better by all of the ear training. I had the piece memorized within a couple of days of picking it up. From all my years of listening to the Suzuki recordings and because my teacher had me do a special listening assignment each week, my ears are now pretty fine-tuned. If I am struggling with fingerings and bowings in a new piece, I try to get hold of several recordings and listen to how others do it. Because of all my Suzuki ear training, I can hear what string something is on and what position and for bowings I can tell what to do. It's a big help. Sometimes, too, I get musical ideas. However, my teacher suggested that I listen to as many recordings as I can and that I can tell what I like and don't like about ways different performers play something. I don't need to copy, though, but it never hurts to listen to what others are doing. However, I don't have to have a recording to learn a piece.
  8. : The average standard of orchestral playing among high school students who have come through the standard Suzuki program (with memorization) is higher than among adult community orchestra players from previous generations. I have also known three players who came through the Suzuki program to go on to be college majors in violin-inlcuding one who was the STRAD magazine "cover girl" of May 1993 (although it's not mentioned in the acompanying article). I'm sure I know others who also went on in music - I just don't know they did. : These players, and many others, made it through the Suzuki program and went on to "conventional" teachers of the older and more complete pedagogy. : If you start at an older age than the typical 3-4 year olds, you should progress faster, but you may find some lack of motivation if you become ego-bound by being the oldest in the class. : I know one adult, who dropped his conventional studies to begin again with the standard, memorizing Suzuli approach with a new teacher. : What Bobby has said about starting with sight-reading is true, even for those who have reached the age of reason; although they are often capable of getting through Book 1 within a week, by reading the music, they have trouble getting the right sound. : Andy In Strad Magazine -- I think it might have been December or January -- there was an article about the Indianapolis Violin Competition. In the middle of the article was a statement about the highpoint of the whole competition came on the first night ... (this is not a quote because I don't have the article in front of me) when a young violinist played and it showed what music was all about. The article went on later and said something about that same violinist standing out in the wings being supportive of his fellow competitors. This violinist was Nicholas Kendall. He went all the way through the Suzuki method and was one of the students I looked up to in my Suzuki group when I was little. Whenever I see him now, he is always nice and stops to speak to me--even though I am about 7 years younger. This is what Suzuki is about. I feel sorry for people who think learning to play the violin is just about scales and etudes and flashy pieces. My best friends are my Suzuki friends and musicianship and friendship are very important to us.
  9. : : : Suzuki is a great method to start out with, Bobby has a good point that beginners have enough to deal with, without having to learn to read right off. : : : My big problem with the method is that if you don't like the music you're screwed; you have to learn the tunes until they're memorized, listening to them constantly, really unfun if you're not diggin' on the groove. I think that the first few books are great to get a feel for the fiddle but the inflexibility of the whole method is a big fault. Once you get the gist of making sounds with the violin and become aware of its possiblities then you should be careful to play what you like. I plodded through Suzuki for a long time and ended up burning out on violin. I didn't touch the thing for many years, never really understanding how much fun making music could be. I think that Suzuki's rigidity had a lot to do with it. : : ************************************ : : I suspect you don't know much about what Suzuki is all about. I have two teachers who are among the best Suzuki teachers in the country and there is lots of proof out there that good Suzuki teaching produces outstanding results. Besides that, it has given me a good group of friends and I have a lot of fun -- most of the time. If you "plodded" through Suzuki for a long time, you probably would have "plodded" through whatever you did. Basically, Suzuki repertoire is pretty standard. Some teachers supplement it, some don't, but I have taken in a large studio and don't know anyone who doesn't like the music. Most everyone can't wait to get to the next piece. I have finished the repertoire now and think I am pretty well prepared to go on to other things. I think maybe that you are the one who is rigid. I don't think that you really understand what Suzuki is all about. : : Bobby : Actually I know quite a bit about the Suzuki method, having started the method at the age of four, in 1977. I also know that I really did not like playing the Suzuki method's music but stuck with it because there was the strong doctrine that Suzuki *was* violin. I never felt the joy of making music until much later in life when, of my own volition, I picked up the instrument again and started playing what *I* wanted to. I am very grateful to Suzuki for having given me very solid technical base but I am sad that I lost many years of making music and also sad that there are probably many others like me who never picked up the violin again and never knew musical joy. : I am very happy for you that you have had such wonderful teachers and such a positive experience. Unfortunately, not everyone does and by projecting your experience on to others, you show yourself to be the one with the lack of understanding. : PC Actually, you must have had the misfortune to either have had a bad attitude when you were studying Suzuki and/or an ineffective teacher or an ineffective parent coach. I feel sorry for you. I have seen a number of my friends who have taken from traditional teachers and for the most part they do not play as musically or as well as my Suzuki-trained friends. I think that the quality of the teaching, the quality of the student, and the quality of the environment at home are all contributing factors to the success of a student. My mom says that Suzuki is not really so much of a method as it is a philosophy and is geared at training very young children. Gently and positively. My Suzuki friends all do scales and exercises when they get to a certain point, but our teachers treat us positively (for the most part) and with respect. My friend went to a famous traditional teacher after studying with a Suzuki teacher all his life and the teacher yelled at him. I don't think I want to have a teacher that yells at him. Also, I think that Suzuki teachers lots of time have training in how to teach -- maybe more now than back in 1977. It takes more to be a good teacher than just being able to play the violin well.
  10. : I played violin throughout grade & high school, always on rental : instruments. Here it is about 12 years later, and my father has picked up a : old, dusty violin at a rummage sale (I was not present.) Before I take it : to hopefully be restrung, or see what other repairs it may need, I need to clean it & the : case. I heard once putting mothballs inside the case for a few days helps, even when : there are no visible insects. Is this true? Any other advice on cleaning it up properly? : Thank you! I think that the mothballs inside the case might work, but when we had mites, the luthier we use just said to lightly spray the case (leaving the violin out until it was dry) and close the case up for a short period. I wouldn't worry about cleaning the violin, though. Just let the luthier do it -- make sure you take it to a reputable shop, not just a local music store. We have gotten a few instruments at auctions and our luthier has been good about letting us know if it is worth fixing up. They are much better at cleaning up a grungy instrument than you would be. Good luck with it -- we have gotten a couple of decent instruments this way. Bobby
  11. Michael Koeberling has a picture of my violin on his website. I think it's pretty cool, too. It's on his 1999 poster. Here's the url: http://www.fineinstruments.com/order_poster.html Bobby
  12. : I started Suzuki when I was 6. I regret it because now I'm finished with it and can't read music for crap, I will admit that I can play by ear extremely well, but how is that going to help more than being able to read music well? Dear Adam, Have you finished all the Suzuki books and can't read well? Or have you just finished taking with the Suzuki method. I think that if there are lots of us out here who read really well who studied with the Suzuki method, there must be a problem a) with the student and their diligence; or the individual teacher. There are many Suzuki teachers out there who teach reading skills and have a lot of success. I guess it was your tough luck you didn't get such a teacher or perhaps you didn't work at it.
  13. : Suzuki is a great method to start out with, Bobby has a good point that beginners have enough to deal with, without having to learn to read right off. : My big problem with the method is that if you don't like the music you're screwed; you have to learn the tunes until they're memorized, listening to them constantly, really unfun if you're not diggin' on the groove. I think that the first few books are great to get a feel for the fiddle but the inflexibility of the whole method is a big fault. Once you get the gist of making sounds with the violin and become aware of its possiblities then you should be careful to play what you like. I plodded through Suzuki for a long time and ended up burning out on violin. I didn't touch the thing for many years, never really understanding how much fun making music could be. I think that Suzuki's rigidity had a lot to do with it. ************************************ I suspect you don't know much about what Suzuki is all about. I have two teachers who are among the best Suzuki teachers in the country and there is lots of proof out there that good Suzuki teaching produces outstanding results. Besides that, it has given me a good group of friends and I have a lot of fun -- most of the time. If you "plodded" through Suzuki for a long time, you probably would have "plodded" through whatever you did. Basically, Suzuki repertoire is pretty standard. Some teachers supplement it, some don't, but I have taken in a large studio and don't know anyone who doesn't like the music. Most everyone can't wait to get to the next piece. I have finished the repertoire now and think I am pretty well prepared to go on to other things. I think maybe that you are the one who is rigid. I don't think that you really understand what Suzuki is all about. Bobby
  14. : What do people out there think about Suzuki method? : Do people agree that children should be taught how to : read music right at the start or should they learn by : ear first? Well, I learned Suzuki method, starting when I was 4 and I read music now very well. I started reading music when I was 6 and in Book 4. My mother says I wouldn't have been ready to read when I was 4. I have been watching her teach some little kids and there is so much to do with getting them "set up" -- you know with their feed in the right place, their posture right, their hands in the right position on the violin and bow, getting their bow arm to move using big muscles at first, that it would be crazy to ask them to read music on top of that. I'm 13 now and have finished the Suzuki books. Learning this way, listening to the tapes has made memorization incredibly easy for me. How many of you out their have problems memorizing. I think that Suzuki students learn to memorize from an early age. They learn to listen and sing the music inside of themselves. I never never never have problems memorizing. And I don't have problems reading either. Most of my friends don't have problems reading who have learned by the Suzuki method either and those who do probably are either not working at it or would have had problems with traditional teaching as well.
  15. I can sing notes on pitch without a reference note. The only thing is, I have to sing some notes an octave lower because I can't hit the high notes. The problem is, I think that the way I learned you have to start before you are 8 or 9 years old and it's easiest before you are 7. My teacher had my mother hold up a card with one note on it. I had to identify the note by singing it on pitch and then check myself on my violin -- so I learned to read notes this way, too. My mother had a keyboard nearby which was tuned to A-440 and she also checked me because when you are really little, sometimes you don't play the notes on pitch. We added notes one at a time and she mixed them up so that I never had a reference note to start with. I can also sing intervals from learning this way, although not quite as well. I stopped doing the notecards I think when I was about 7 or 7 1/2, but now, if my mother says sing an e flat or an a#, I can do it with no problem. Bobby
×
×
  • Create New...