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Carl E

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  1. Question for mike or other Helicore users - do you need to use fine tuners with them? If not, are they hard to get in tune? Any special tricks? Once in tune, I would imagine they should stay in tune as well as or better than perlon strings. : i would guess helicores would do the trick, but dominants seem to me to respond pretty quick so i don't know how much difference you will see but steel core is the way to go. helicores have the least metalic sound of the steel core strings, but jargars are pretty good and i wouldn't be surprised if the new larsons are just as good. : mike
  2. I just got the Glasser carbon fiber a couple of weeks ago, after using a Glasser composite for the past year. I would say that the carbon fiber plays better, sounds better, and looks better in every way. Its hard to say whether it is twice as good (it is twice as expensive). The only thing some people may not like about the carbon fiber is that it is black, where the composite is brown, more like wood color. Both are much better, in my opinion, than most wood bows you will find in this price range. If you want to know anything more specific about the differences, feel free to email me. : Can anyone tell me the difference between the carbon fiber Glasser bow and the composite Glasser (besides the $100 difference in price)? I did a search of Glasser postings and the composite bow seemed to get high ratings, but was wondering if the carbon fiber would be any better. Thanks for you help - I need to tell Santa which one I want.
  3. I agree with Dean's comments. It plays like a much more expensive carbon fiber bow, and far better than the wood bows I have tried anywhere near this price range. The slide and eye look like abalone or very nice mother of pearl. By the way, the best price I have found is at Loxahatchee Vintage Strings, at $185, including priority mail shipping. (www.lvstrings.com) : I just got my Glasser carbon graphite bow from Shar and I must say I am VERY impressed. It performs about as good as the CodaBow Conservatory model, and at $189 it's an incredible buy! I very highly recommend it.... : It's beautifully crafted (for the price) also.....
  4. Does anyone know of any websites with violin theme screen savers to download, either free or for sale?
  5. I am considering buying the Glasser Carbon Fiber, and currently have the composite. What do you feel the differences are to be worth an extra $100? Have you compared the Glasser Carbon to any other carbon fiber bows (Coda, Musicary, etc.). : Hi, : other than violin bow, viola bow, etc., i dont think there are variations on the bow. also... i liked it at first but later on i didnt think it was any better than most brazilwood bows i've tried. not bad at all for the money though. still, for only around $100 more, i think that Glasser Carbon Fiber bow (i have both) is a better value. : andy
  6. My first bow was a student type brazilwood bow, which was really bouncy. I later got a Glasser composite (not the Glasser Fiberglass!) bow that sells for about $90 from mail-order places. That bow is far less bouncy, and stays on track much better than my cheap wood bow. Now that I have more experience, I can play OK with the wood bow, but I still have that bouncing problem on occasion. You may want to try out other bows, either at a shop or other people's bows, to see if that makes much of a difference. : What is it about my bow stroke that causes the bow to bounce on the string? : I've only been playing for a couple of weeks but this is a particularly annoying problem that I occasionally have with my long bow strokes. Any suggestions?
  7. I have a Scott Cao violin that I paid less than your price range for that I am very happy with. It was made in China, and set up in Scott's California shop. I had also tried several eastern European violins that were finished by a local violin shop that I did not think were nearly as good sounding, and cost a little more. The disadvantage was that I could not try it out before I bought it (although I could have returned it) since I bought it mail-order. I would say to try as many in your price range as you can, because there is a wide variation in tone and playability. Others on this board are strong advocates of older German factory fiddles that have aged well. Hope you find your dream fiddle! : I'm a beginner looking for a better violin than what I have now. I'm prepared to go $1000-1500 in the hopes that this price range will get me something that I'll be happy with for a while. : The McHugh violin shop has a whole web page devoted to Chinese instruments. They say that the quality has gone up drastically in recent years, especially when compared with similar-priced German instruments (whose prices have gone way up, so they claim). They offer a $1500 outfit on their page that I've been looking at: "These are absolutely the best sounding violins (new or used) in our shop when compared with others up to and exceeding $2000". : Anybody have any advice or experience with these?
  8. I think I have found at least part of the problem. Someone suggested that the type of rosin I was using may have made the tone too harsh if I was using too much. I wiped as much as I could from the strings and the bow hair, and it sounded much better right away. I was using Hidersine rosin, just because that is what I have. I know that people here seem to like Goldflex, Hill and Bernadel, among others (I am not trying to start another argument here!) and was wondering if some type of rosin seems to produce a more mellow tone as opposed to others. : I have been playing for about a year, and have a mid-level student violin (supposedly made in a workshop environment) that is a few months old. When I first start playing it the sound has a bit of a harsh edge, but not really unpleasantly so. After 15 or 20 minutes of playing the sound becomes less edgy and is warmer and rounder. My question is, is this typical of all violins, of newer violins, or of just certain violins. Or maybe my ear is just getting tired and doesn't hear all of the higher tones after a while. This occurs with both synthetic and gut strings. Any ideas on why this happens, and if this will continue as the violin ages? I do play it for at least a half hour every day. Thanks in advance for any insights.
  9. I have been playing for about a year, and have a mid-level student violin (supposedly made in a workshop environment) that is a few months old. When I first start playing it the sound has a bit of a harsh edge, but not really unpleasantly so. After 15 or 20 minutes of playing the sound becomes less edgy and is warmer and rounder. My question is, is this typical of all violins, of newer violins, or of just certain violins. Or maybe my ear is just getting tired and doesn't hear all of the higher tones after a while. This occurs with both synthetic and gut strings. Any ideas on why this happens, and if this will continue as the violin ages? I do play it for at least a half hour every day. Thanks in advance for any insights.
  10. After playing with only synthetic strings, I would like to try a set of gut for comparison. I don't want to invest in Olives at this point, so any recommendations on gut strings that are on the brighter side? Are Kaplan Golden Spiral or Pirastro Gold Label brighter than Eudoxas?
  11. The neck on my violin, which is a new one, has a layer of varnish on it. This has not really caused any problems of the type that you have described, although I am a beginner and am not playing a lot to the point where I sweat a lot and I don't shift to higher positions yet. My question is, would you recommend removing the varnish in the manner that you described, or since I am not experiencing any problems, should I leave it as is (for now anyway). Also - if I decide it is a job I don't want to attempt myself, how much might a luthier charge to to it? : Hello: : The necks of violins, violas, etc. are not supposed to be varnished because they will do just what you describe! Possibly there was vanish or French polish on the neck. Just the least amount of sweat or skin acid will soften varnish and turn it to a sticky mess. : If this is your problem, try a little baby oil, mineral oil or any "white/clear" oil and a piece of 0000 grade steel wool. Wet the steel wool slightly with the oil and rub the neck. When the steel wool gums up, get another piece. Make sure what you rub is the neck only...you could take off more than goop. Alcohol may work even better, but is dangerous in that the rest of the fiddle varnish could be damaged. Use a clean cloth or a paper towel and rub ALL the oil off. : Be very careful...don't get oil on the strings...could transfer to bow hair and that would never do! Go slow and easy...mistakes are easily made. : Good luck, : Al
  12. Actually, George sent me some tape to fix the slipping, but I didn't like the feel of the rubber grip, which is why I plan to have it changed. : George Behary posted a few months ago with a recommendation on how to take care of the slipping thumb cushion problem. I took his advice and have had no problems with the grip since. You might try to find his post by looking up "George Behary" in the archive, or he might send it to you directly if he reads this. : : I bought on with an outfit around the beginning of the year. It plays really well for what it costs. I have not had any problems with the hair falling out, excessive hair breakage, or with the hair taking the initial rosin. All of these things were comments that people had reported on previous postings. The only negative I have to report is that the grip is of molded rubber that has the molded ridges still in it, and the grip slides around, as if it came unglued. I will probably have the grip replaced with leather when I go for the first rehair. : : Carl E : : : I read almost all the board info. on the bow and have not seen much about it in 1999. I was wondering if anyone has bought one recently and had any problems with quality. There seemed to be some manufacturing inconsistencies with hair coming out and weight of the bow in the 1997-98 postings. I plan to buy one soon. Thanks.
  13. I bought on with an outfit around the beginning of the year. It plays really well for what it costs. I have not had any problems with the hair falling out, excessive hair breakage, or with the hair taking the initial rosin. All of these things were comments that people had reported on previous postings. The only negative I have to report is that the grip is of molded rubber that has the molded ridges still in it, and the grip slides around, as if it came unglued. I will probably have the grip replaced with leather when I go for the first rehair. Carl E : I read almost all the board info. on the bow and have not seen much about it in 1999. I was wondering if anyone has bought one recently and had any problems with quality. There seemed to be some manufacturing inconsistencies with hair coming out and weight of the bow in the 1997-98 postings. I plan to buy one soon. Thanks.
  14. I am an adult beginning violin player who just started taking lessons a few weeks ago, although I was playing by ear before that. I have been reading this board for a while and have gotten a lot of good advice. I still have a few questions that I was hoping you veterans out there could help me out with. My instrument is a new Chinese hand made one in the advanced student range (not a factory cheapo). My questions are: What is meant by "playing in" a new instrument? I gather that it has something to do with the wood responding to the vibrations, maybe like breaking in a new baseball glove. How does this change the sound and how long might it take to play in a new violin - days, weeks, years? My violin is somewhat bright in tone, but seems to get more mellow after I have been playing for a half hour or so. Is this common or just my ears getting tired (this violin is pretty loud)? Or is this mellower sound what I can expect once it is played in? It came with Dominant strings, and I understand that by changing to a different brand of sting I can warm up the tone a little. Any opinions on John Pearse Artiste? I have seen a lot of discussion on various rosin types. Does the quality and type have a very significant effect on the tone, or is it relatively minor, especially for a beginner? I am using Hidersine Deluxe, which came with my violin. Is there any particular order in which to replace strings. I know to not take them all off at once, but which one first? Can anyone recommend a book on classical music in general, with an emphasis on violin music. In other words, a book that might describe the various periods (Baroque, Romantic, etc.) and types of works (concertos, solos, sonatas, etc.), which composers were considered the best, and some examples of their best works. I don't mean that it should have music written out, just an explanation so I can by sheet music or a CD. I need to become more knowledgeable of the music I am hoping to learn how to play! Thanks for considering my long list, and feel free to answer any of these you choose to.
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