Al

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About Al

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  1. What makes a Stradivarious so special?
  2. One Week Words & Music by Ed Robertson It's been one week since you looked at me cocked your head to the side and said I'm angry. Five days since you laughed at me saying get that together come back and see me. Three days since the living room I realized it's all my fault, but couldn't tell you Yesterday you'd forgiven me but it'll still be two days till I say I'm sorry Hold it now and watch the hoodwink As I make you stop, think You'll think you're looking at Aquaman I summon fish to the dish, although I like the Chalet Swiss I like the sushi 'cause it's n
  3. I am in search of a violin bow and have been trying out rather expensive bows, but since I don't know the going rate for alot of the makers I don't know if the asking price is fair. Does a 'blue book' exist for violins and bows like it does for cars?
  4. Hi....I didn't mean to spell "frequencies" wrong, and yes, those are equal temp. freqs. Easy to go to fifths with a bow.... At least A 440 was right...right? :-) Al
  5. : I am looking for gum turpentine & linseed oil. Hope someone could advise me the source. Thanks
  6. Good luck with one of the two in Atlanta, Daniel. If the computer goofed, let me know... Al
  7. A rose to Rose...Thanks, Al
  8. Hi Mimi...world's greatest bass player! Well, the iron ions liberated by heat are mixed with the varnish being cooked at a high temperature...under 300 degrees...if over 400 degrees..it goes hypothermal...like an atomic bomb...BLOOEY!!!. Anyway, the ions of iron..can't remember if ferric or ferrous...become active cations..slowly turning the nice honey brown varnish to a black varnish as time passes...when totally black, the chemical reaction is done. Just ignore the chemical stuff...believe me: varnish cooked in an iron pot eventually turns black...why didn't I say that in the first place
  9. Hi---no no, don't use the glues you mentioned. The best thing to do is moisten the gluing surfaces with hot water...no much, just lightly moistem. And...I assume you have loosened the strings...the neck will bend if you haven't!! After moistening, lay the two gluing surfaces together, and strap in place the best you can with masking tape. The old animal glue is still there...just needs moistening...leave to dry over night, then remove the masking tape...restring and tune up...watch that the bridge stays straight up as you tune...blacken the string grooves with a lead pencil so you can ea
  10. Hi...it is best to put strings on...one at a time...and keep them tuned to pitch. Loosening will not only wear out strings and pegs, but the poor violin will not know how to function without a continuous pressure on the belly. Yes, gut strings dry out and go false...also, if they are not up to pitch all the time, they will continue to stretch each time they are put on...a lot of tuning! Synthetics have the same stretch problem, to a lesser degree. They do not go false just in storage as do gut strings. The least time taken messing with tuning, the better off you will be...I think... And, yo
  11. Hi Jimmy....well...guess yours was silver mounted and high quality pernambuco....the higher priced ones are ok, just variable in quality since they are machine made. Please don't cry...if it plays well, you could have done a lot worse. Use it and enjoy! Regards, Al
  12. Andy...my shop does the same thing. As for the "E" string, Gold Label really out lasts the Dominant E...and better sound...and doesn't snap as often as Dominant. We have tried the other synthetics...they have a less harsh sound during the break-in period...a few days of solid playing...well, as solid as you can... Then, compared to Dominant, they sound muffled or meek, and they do not respond as quickly. We still have customers searching for something better. Oh yes, we are finding that the 27 1/2 ga. Westminster E improves some violins greatly...higher tension..speaks loudly and fairly quic
  13. : Hello. : I have just about finished making my first violin, and now I want to make a bow to go with it. I ordered two unfinished bows and they have been sitting on my table for a month. I've got a book by H. S. Wake on rehairing, but it doesn't get into making. I've seen one book just on making but it was over $200. What I really need are just the templates, I think I could figure out the rest just from the picture. : If anyone knows where to get a book, or can explain in great detail here, I would be very, very happy. : Thanks!
  14. Hello: Those with dark stuff around the bridge, looking burnt, are modeled after the Del Gesu Cannone violin...quite ugly! The cheaper the violin, the more ugly the "antiquing" looks...over done!! Now, the totally black violins were honey brown when first made. The makers didn't know it, but cooking varnish in an iron pot seemed to make a lovey color varnish....little did they know...that in a hundred years, or less, the color would turn, gradually, to black. The reason is that the ferrous cations cooked into the varnish are unstable and light sensitive...the more light, the darker the colo
  15. Jane...seems no one will answer you. Hummmm? Well, the Monier violins are French factory made. Each one will sound different from its "twin." So, you need to try several and have your peers and teacher help you determine sound. Personally, I'd try another brand or two...or maybe an older violin (Jeffery...don't hit me!) so you have better comparisons. Regards, Al