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Andrew Victor

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Everything posted by Andrew Victor

  1. : Either this Snakey goes or I go! I will be residing at The keyboard talking about Keyboards until this is resolved, and furthermore I don't like others using my name for their posts! : Andy
  2. Either this Snakey goes or I go! I will be residing at The keyboard talking about Keyboards until this is resolved, and furthermore I don't like others using my name for their posts! Andy
  3. WL : About 40 - 60 minutes is all it takes to be completely effective. Effectiveness starts to drop in 2-4 hrs and other symptoms may set in. I wouldn't monitor heart rate. What med. does is block the adrenaline response so it will not rise, but I don't think it drops it. I would not take more than 10 mg the first time. If that does it, try 5 mg the second time. As I said before, 5 mg works for me - once split a 20 mg dose three ways for a performance of the Brahms Horn Trio. Sounds like you have a potential asthma response - so be careful and keep the dose low. The only way to test it is to give a performance, perhaps you can arrange one for family and friends, or a senior citizens club or a school class. The only thing you test if you take it to practice is its potential negative effects on you, not its efficacy. Andy
  4. : Dear Andrew Victor, where are you from... my name is andrew victor also...give me a line and we'll talk instuments...
  5. This subject has been posted here before. If you check it out using the Search function you will find reference to humidity cycling and to storing the instrument next to a vibrating device (like a room air purifier). Realize that the wood in a new instrument may be decades or even hundreds of years off the tree. It has been beat around something fierce by the maker, if not be previous players. If there is anything left to "age" it may be the varnish, and it should play out rather fast. If the top was graduated properly by the maker, then it shold not improve with playing. If it was not optimally graduated, then it would take decades of constant playing to vibrate off enough wood to improve it - if that is even possible. I don't think the wood remembers what sound has passed through it, the varnish may, I think, but only in the way its dampening effects may be diminished. I have bought two brand-new violins because of the way they sounded and played, in comparison to some older - even much, much older well named instruments. Two others were only a few years old when I acquired them for the same reason. They did not seem to need playing in - although it hasn't hurt. Andy
  6. : The paint has chipped off my glasser around the frog and I see that greyish color too. why did they paint the stick anyway. couldn't they just add a coloring to the carbon fiber material? Could any maker shed light on the manufacturing process? thanks. Based on a little graphite/epoxy composite experience in the rocket-motor case business (not violin bows) the addition of coloring agents not the epoxy would change its properties. In addition, any color would have to compete with the overriding blackness that the carbon fibers impart to the mix. therefore, painting would be an easier way to go. Now for the more expensive bows (like Berg and Rolland) perhaps they have a single (or a few) formulation(s) that include(s) coloring agents. Andy
  7. The violins by the Glass family of Klingenthal, germany vary in value, depending (among other things) upon the family member who made it. Johann T. Glass (1819-1895) was probably the most gifted member of the family. Friedrich August Glass worked between 1840 and 1855. Their instruments are reported to have an inferior varnish and a rather hard tone. (from Fairfield's book "Known violin Makers"). Instruments from Johann Glass and his workshop have been bringing $2K-$3K in recent auctions. Violins by August have not been offered. Andy
  8. I am absolutely positive that the sound of the instrument a child plays can be motivating or demotivating. In the case of my granddaughter, by switching to good instruments after one year of lessons we seem to have assured her continuing love for violin playing. She loves her instrument and cares for it very well and loves the sound that it makes. One factor that I think is very important is that the better instruments can be forgiving of sloppy bowing, so that the screech or scratch that crooked bowing can cause on a lousy violin does not occur on a better instrument, usually only a diminution in the volume and quality of the sound instead. The parents are grateful for this too. Andy
  9. Hey, I certainly didn't mean to offend you or anyone else. I'm sorry if I did. I only meant to point out that after one plays for a long time - in my case, a long, long, long time, you acquire a feel for where everything is by "touch" and sound. Even the position of the bow between the bridge and fingerboard is detected by sound and feel and automatically compensated for to achieve the desired effects. Perhaps, only deliberately playing over the fingerboard on some pianissimo passages one might look to see that the bow is far enough "down," or at least deliberately move it beyond the more common range of playing. Andy
  10. Carl Tononi was a very respected maker, as were his brother and father. More of their violins have remained unsold than have sold at recent auctions, but those that have sold have gone for between $50,000 and $100,000. Of course it could be another case of fraudulent labeling, but the fragmented Wurlitzer label would be a clue that a most reputable dealer had sold it. I thinky you might indeed have a treasure, and you should check it out. good luck. Andy
  11. Most violinists don't actually look at their fingers much. They watch the point of contact where the bow meets the string, or stare vacantly into the distance. : GOOD LUCK! Actually most violinists spend much of their playing time semi-sight reading, and they watch the music, and if there is one, the conductor, or others they are playing with. And their communication with the violin and bow is entirely by ear and feel of the hands. I have not looked at my violin or bow, while playing, for half a century. On cello, I sometimes look at the bow, especially if a soft passage is coming up, and I want to position the bow in a special way (for distance from the bridge-not for specific string). With a better cello, I probably would leave it entirely to ear and feel too. If I couldn't do things this way, I would not be able to sight read or play in an orchestra. Just in case those are things you want to do. Andy
  12. : So which of the 3 composite bow companies (Glasser,Durro,& Coda) has ones for under $100? With orchestra starting up next week I'm planning on finally getting out and buying one this week. While I know it's a <$100 fibreglass bow I want to get, I'm not certain which brand I'm looking for.Can anyone help? What about web pages for Glasser and Durro? (I've seen Coda) -t.c. IT IS NOT A "FIGERGLASS BOW" THAT YOU WANT! I would recommend a Glasser composite bow. You can get a Glasser violin bow from SHAR, Southwest Strings, or one of several other mail order dealers for about $80 plus shipping. In my opinion, and that of a number of others, these are the playing equivalent of many $300-$400 wood bows. I have not noticed that these bows have the same clubby feel as the Glasser fiberglass student bows which can be had as small as 1/31-size, and for as little as about $16. On the contrary, the feel and playing qualities of these bows are quite amazing for the price, in my opinion - for 5X the price. Also contrary to "wildcard's" posting below, I don't get a plain vanilla sound (whatever that is) from any of these bows with my violins or my cello. On my viola, I do notice that the Glasser (and Durro) viola bows are lesser than my W. Seifert pernambuco viola bow. The Coda viola bow I had a chance to play with once was distictly better. Andy Andy
  13. : I don't know why my E string often has screeching sound when I string cross to E string. Is the problem related to the quality of the string? : Thank you in advance! : Samantha This is a common problem, and I have read about solutions on this bulletin board. For one thing, some very good strings have the problem on some very good violins. I have experienced the problem with Pirastro Goldstahl E strings (the strings that come in their Olive set, one of the most expensive string sets). There are several ways to eliminate the problem. (1) Switch from a "wire" string to a wrapped string - I think that the Tonica E string is an example, but there are others as well. Most catalogs offer sufficient description of the strings. (2) Remove the little "protective tube" from the bridge, and just let the string sit on the bridge notch - but be sure the notch is reinforced with a leather or parchment protector - or, a drop of super glue, when fully hardened will protect it. (3) Sometimes, just a different brand of wire string will solve the problem. (4) Sometimes, this problem occurs because the pad of your left index finger is contacting the E string and causing an overtone (in this case a false tone) to sound. It that is the case, the bridge might be too far toward the E string and need centering. Andy
  14. : : Thanks Adean, I tried the test with a number of bows with the following results: : 1. The following bows make my finger tingle: : F.N. Voirin, violin : Codabow, violin (composite) : Albert Nurnberger, cello : W. Seifert, Viola : Vitali, viola (inexpensive wood) : Glasser, viola (fiberglas) : 2. The following bows seemed "dead" in the test: : R. Weichold, violin (Tourte copy-stamped, French-style frog) : Durro, viola and cello : Glasser composite violin (59 g), viola, and cello : H. R. Pfretzschner, violin : unnamed wood, violin : 3. The following bows had a little life, but possibly at a lower frequency than the "tingling" bows listed first: : Durro, violin : Glasser composite, violin (57 g) : : The tension in the hair seems to make a difference in the effect in the marginal bows. : Do you have any idea why a "fine" bow should have such a characteristic (i.e., a knock on the wood causes a vibration through the closed system of the stick in tension with the hair, and why this would be good? : Andy
  15. : Thanks Adean, I tried the test with a number of bows with the following results: 1. The following bows make my finger tingle: F.N. Voirin, violin Codabow, violin (composite) Albert Nurnberger, cello W. Seifert, Viola Vitali, viola (inexpensive wood) Flasser, viola (fiberglas) 2. The following bows seemed "dead" in the test: R. Weichold, violin (Toute copy) Durro, viola and cello Glasser composite violin (59 g), viola, and cello H. R. Pfretzschner, violin unnamed wood, violin 3. The following bows had a little life, but not possibly at a lower frequency than the "tingling" bows: Durro, violin Glasser composite, violin (57 g) The tension in the hair seems to make a difference in the effect in the marginal bows. Do you have any idea why a "fine" bow should have such a characteristic (i.e., a knock on the bow causes a vibration through the closed system of the stick in tension with the hair? Andy
  16. : As a new student of the violin, do any of you advocate the use of tapes as a means to learn the correct location of the notes on the fingerboard? My teacher has left this up to me.. I'm thinking it would be help but am concerned I may rely to heavily on them and not learn correctly. What's your take? It seems to me that the last time I used tape on the fingerboard for a beginning student (age 6), we rather quickly settled down to retaining only one tape (for the third finger). In "Twinkle," the third finger A string seemd to be useful for setting up the "crossover" from the E string, and the other two fingers "fell" into position quite well. I seem to recall that we finished with the tape at about the time that we finished Suzuki Book I. For an adult student, I would rather rely on building the left hand position upon careful playing of the G-major, 2-octave scale. If the intonation errors cannot be heard and corrected by the student, then I would recommend studying piano or harmonica instead. The tapes are cannot really be felt by the player, and therefore, a special effort must be made to determine where the fingers are in relation to the tapes by sight. And in that regard, the tapes can never be so accurately set, nor the fingers so precisely placed that the visual reference is unambiguous. (In other words, if the teacher places the tapes for his/her own fingers, they will have a different relationship for the student's fingers.) Andy
  17. : : : While I can certainly see (and appreciate) the need for comfort while playing the violin, my own choice is not to use one. When I was a little kid, I wanted to use a rest of some kind; after all, everyone else did. My teacher said I could if I wanted too but that they were for "sissies." I don't actually believe that (of course) but what nine-year old boy wants to do anything wherein he would be construed as a sissy? : : While in college, I had a teacher that suggested I try a Kun, but I was so used to having no rest at all that having one was very uncomfortable. Some rests constrict the sound because players wedge them on too tightly (At least, that's what my ears tell me.). But, I don't think it makes enough of a difference to call them bad. : I also was "raised" without a shoulder rest, and played sans support for the first 30 years. I made some accomodation to my physique by using a high chinrest, a Stuber, on each of my violins. Then in my mid 30s, while trying to improve my playing, I found that I needed "one of those uncomfortable shoulder supports" to expand my arm vibrato to include more wrist and finger motions for shading the sound to my wishes. : While my neck is not long, it is not as short as that of the typical violinist who does not use a shoulder rest. : While I can still play without a shoulder rest (30 years after starting to use one), I do find that the lower left shoulder position, and the angle the instrument makes to my shoulder that are maintained with the rest make playing absolutely no strain on the left side of my body. The violin angle also makes it easier on my bow arm. Of the 5, or so rests I have tried, I prefer the Kun (I have one each of three types of Kun and they all work equally well). My Viva La Musica, on the other hand, did not work as well for me (although I could live with it and it is a lovely thing to behold), but it works very well for my granddaughter on a 3/4-size instrument and will also fit a full-size as she grows. So, if you are going to try to add a shoulder rest, I think it is a good idea to take your violin to a shop and try out a variety for comfort and effectiveness. : Andy
  18. : While I can certainly see (and appreciate) the need for comfort while playing the violin, my own choice is not to use one. When I was a little kid, I wanted to use a rest of some kind; after all, everyone else did. My teacher said I could if I wanted too but that they were for "sissies." I don't actually believe that (of course) but what nine-year old boy wants to do anything wherein he would be construed as a sissy? : While in college, I had a teacher that suggested I try a Kun, but I was so used to having no rest at all that having one was very uncomfortable. Some rests constrict the sound because players wedge them on too tightly (At least, that's what my ears tell me.). But, I don't think it makes enough of a difference to call them bad. I also was "raised" without a shoulder rest, and played sans support for the first 30 years. I made some accomodation to my physique by using a high chinrest, a Stuber, on each of my violins. Then in my mid 30s, while trying to improve my playing, I found that I needed "one of those uncomfortable shoulder supports" to expand my arm vibrato to include more wrist and finger motions for shading the sound to my wishes. While my neck is not long, it is not as short as that of the typical violinist who does not use a shoulder rest. While I can still play without a shoulder rest (30 years after starting to use one), I do find that the lower right shoulder position, and the angle the instrument makes to my shoulder that are maintained with the rest make playing absolutely no strain on the left side of my body. The violin angle also makes it easier on my bow arm. Of the 5, or so rests I have tried, I prefer the Kun (I have one each of three types of Kun and they all work equally well). My Viva La Musica, on the other hand, did not work as well for me (although I could live with it and it is a lovely thing to behold), but it works very well for my granddaughter on a 3/4-size instrument and will also fit a full-size as she grows. So, if you are going to try to add a shoulder rest, I think it is a good idea to take your violin to a shop and try out a variety for comfort and effectiveness. Andy
  19. : I can see where a Violinist needs a shoulder rest! Fiddlers : don't need no shoulder rests. Violinists need to keep their : nose up. Fiddlers like to bare down and get into the music, : how can you do that with 2 inches of plastic holding your head : up? Looks pretty uncomfortable. Not having to vibrato or shift positions, it is easy to understand your disdain for shoulder rests. In fact, I wonder why you can't do the whole thing with one hand tied behind your back. Andy : Fiddler.
  20. : : : : : Mr. Victor ,I have been following your postings for some time now. I have always apreciated the store of knowledge you bring to the board and am inspired by your obviously great love of music. It is a shame that some people mistake these qualities for something less than virtuous!
  21. : Vibrato is an expressive device, and so its speed varies depending on the context. I think there's a difference between a fast vibrato and what I call a "nervous vibrato." Many students have a nervous vibrato, which is very fast and not really under control. You should be able to vary the speed of your vibrato. That may be why your teacher is trying to get you to slow down. Or perhaps you're working on a very lyrical piece, where a slower vibrato is appropriate. You could ask your teacher. The vibrato speed heard among top professionals is usually between 5 and 7 cyles per second. Often the sound of a vibrato is spoiled by making it too broad. A slow, broad vibrato sounds like a wobble (or warble). A vibrato of the proper speed and width can really bring out an incredible tone from a fine instrument. Andy
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