Richf

Members
  • Content Count

    1651
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Richf

  • Rank
    Enthusiast

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling

Recent Profile Visitors

6997 profile views
  1. Ha! It wasn't in the Scarlatti program. Maybe in the Bach? I recall him visiting someone to have an adjustment to his violin, but must have missed the dig at new makers. His own instrument is certainly an old beauty. And in the Vivaldi program he shows off a loaner Strad (the Jackson-something?). It's so nice to have those free links to all the performances. I hope they keep them up for a while.
  2. Maybe he could marry into the family to improve his standing.
  3. The program on Domenico Scarlatti last night did not disappoint. Part travelog, part musical history, part great performance (and not just violin). I really had not heard of Scott Yoo before this series PBS started. A quick google turned up his name in an old Maestronet thread from 2000 on "The best violinist we've never heard of." From HuangKaiVun: "Has anybody heard the playing of Scott Yoo, the well-known conductor of the Metamorphosen Orchestra? When I was at Juilliard, this guy (a few years my senior) motivated me to practice (i.e. scared me to death) by playing the most difficult repertoire in the halls with a metal practice mute - and he hadn't graduated high school yet!"
  4. Googled from some consular report back in 1918, I believe the conversion rate then was about 5 Bohemian crowns per US dollar. So, that means a $200 violin, a little lower but not too far out of line with sales prices for a Strnad offered in the US in 1925 (from Elkhardt). That U.S. shop listed a Strnad and a Stainer each for $275.
  5. Super-blunt rib corners plus no pins on the back suggests external mould. That as well as the wear pattern on the back makes me think French. But that might be too easy. How about French-trained, maybe somewhere like Turin or someone like Pressenda? That could be consistent with age (I would think not much earlier than mid 1800s).
  6. Ah, the "professional" catch. That explains it. One more advantage to maintaining my amateur (aka limited talent) status. Thanks all.
  7. Perhaps a naive question, but what's wrong with my basic home owners insurance? I once made a claim on Travelors/Geico for a valuable bow broken in shipment w/ USPS, and they paid me with no problem (minus the USPS insurance payout and my deductible, of course). I just had to produce a professional valuation (or a sales invoice). Also, they wanted to have the broken bow. I also once mailed a valuable violin ($10K) to a buyer in China -- checking with my insurer before mailing, they told me it would be covered for full value if lost or damaged in route. My premiums don't reflect a higher cost for the few instruments I have listed on the policy. So, is there some threshold value for instruments where home owner premiums would start to grow with instrument coverage? Perhaps for PhilipKT's cello? I don't know. For me, I think the question would be how high would that incremental premium have to go to exceed the cost of coverage by insurers specializing in musical instruments? Richard
  8. Richf

    Scroll Origin?

    Ha! I have one with an eye even smaller. I wonder what the record is?
  9. Thanks to all for the very helpful comments. Richard
  10. Here are a few additional pics. I find bows especially difficult to photograph -- the nice flaming in the wood doesn't show here at all. Not sure if it's anything more than a "normal" bow, but I'm a sucker for pretty wood. Just now, I'm really only interested in what kind of wrapping to get.
  11. This looks potentially like a nice bow. Once it gets hair, the weight should come out about 60 grams with the current leather lapping. (No maker stamps, but I'm assuming Saxon circa 1900.) Could this leather be original, in which case should I try to keep it? I've never seen leather on a better bow before. My inclination is to go with silk thread, to improve the looks and to keep the balance right. Thanks for any suggestions. Richard
  12. Interesting that the spam programmers could post (even if only the title) without going thru the "I'm not a robot" filter, but then only for the home page listing, not the boards. I'm not the best programmer on the planet. I've given it some thought but still can't figure it out. For any first time visitors this morning, all the cyrillic script and mandarin characters in the discussion listing would have been pretty scary. Glad to know there was no content behind them.
  13. It's strange that the list of current discussions on the Homepage is almost all spam, but the individual boards don't show any. That is, if you only go directly to Pegbox or Fingerboard or Auction Scroll, you would never see the problem.
  14. I'm curious. What's the story with Freemans Auction in Philadelphia? Have they been big on musical instrument sales for long? Is that vast collection in their May sale something associated with Fred Oster? (Hard to imagine that many interesting items coming randomly from individual consignors in the absence of a major marketing effort.) How good are their attributions? Thanks. Richard