Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Joseph

Members
  • Posts

    241
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Joseph

  1. I won't tell you what you should do ... but I can tell you what I do with decent results. After my ground coat, I start applying my color coats on top of that, usually 3-5 coats depending on the varnish shade and type, then I will either put on a few clear coats to rub out if the color is intense enough, or continue with a few more color coats right to the end which I rub out. As far as the raw wood, I have tried sun tanning, spirit based stains and water based stains, but be aware that these must be very light (subtle) and are not meant to achieve color, but rather to enhance the wood figure. A rule I stick to is: "Less varnish is better than more."
  2. HungryHowie, I see that you have removed the comment from your relisted Glier violin ... as agreed, I have done the same on my re-listed violin. Hopefully we will not have to deal with this type of attempted fraud again. Joseph
  3. Thank you. I think that good clear photos are an essential part of selling on the internet along with a fair trial period and return policy. It's difficult enough selling on-line so the more you can offer the better your chances are of making a sale, and of course offering good quality instruments is the other part. It is true that a picture is worth a thousand words, so several pictures are even worth more. Joseph M. Santiago
  4. Joseph

    Bridge profile

    Here is another bridge I just cut today for an intermediate level violin. I tried doing something a little different with the feet and toes this time. I know my pic is not that great, but do you think this is any better?
  5. I don't have any experience with violins made in Poland, but I do own a very nice violin made by a Polish maker who now lives in Chicago. His name is Wladek Stopka and I think his instruments are outstanding. Exquisite workmanship, models and wood.
  6. Joseph

    Bridge profile

    Thanks Michael, that's a compliment I appreciate very much from some one who actually knows his stuff. I see what you mean about the shape of the outer curve above the toe. You'll notice that because of my poor photography I failed to capture the dimension of the bridge and it's cuts. That curve shows more accurately in the back shot than it does on the front because of the angle it was taken from. I've always cut them similar to this, but now I think I'll try more what Daryl has done with his. I like the looks of the slight flip toe over the flat toe too.
  7. I'm the opposite ... I stay up until 2:00 - 2:30 AM (MST) every night and I'm up by about 8:00 - 8:30 AM or so. No doubt that night time is my best time and I'm sluggish in the AM. I do more work and better work from sundown until I go to bed. I read the posts on Maestronet and my mail periodically all day long (and night) between doing my work (I work out of my home). I read every day but post very little. So, in my case it is: "Late to bed and late to rise ..."
  8. Well, I use natural light only which I find works better for me being that I'm not much of a professional photographer. I have tried using a lighting set up and just couldn't get good results. I also don't use a very fancy camera (I use a Kodak DX4530) and never use the flash. After I take the photos I do a little work with them in Adobe Photo Shop such as cropping, sharpening, color correction, etc. .. but I try to get them to look very close to the actual violin when I'm done adjusting the color (at least on my monitor).
  9. Joseph

    Bridge profile

    Thanks Screechee, I don't want this "hot" thread to get off topic, but I'll answer briefly ... basically I just tint the varnish as dark as I can which allows me to get a dark color in less coats (normally 4-5 thin color coats) but to be honest, it has been trial and error for me and I've had a hard time getting a standard formula that I really like especially for red varnish. Michael's tip on using a bit of asphalt helps too! Also, I used a darker than normal water ground stain on the violin which I believe you are referring to, but it ended up coming out decent anyway. Joseph
  10. Joseph

    Bridge profile

    Cool thread ... I definitely don't claim to be the best at cutting bridges, but here is one of my recent violin bridges. I cut this one from a Despiau blank and I purposely left the knees a little thick for this particular violin. Critique welcome!
  11. Well, in order to protect myself I have added a statement in my listing so as not to scare off any potential buyers. If you do not sell your violin this time around and have to relist it, please remove that statement and I will do the same with mine. 1936 Alessandro G. Salvatore Violin
  12. This is very interesting since I am the seller of such a violin. Here is the link to my current listing which of course is real and valid: 1936 Alessandro G. Salvatore Violin Do you have information for the user who had listed the fake auction for this violin? I report many spoof e-mails to Ebay and Pay Pal every month so do be careful when any one asks for your user information. Never use the links provided in these e-mails to log into your accounts. Any information you can provide would be helpful because if someone is stealing my listings I'd like to know and take appropriate action. I have been selling on Ebay since 1998 and have run into very few problems such as this because I take great caution in everything I do. I don't think your comment in your listing will help out my auction any either so I'd appreciate it very much if you removed that, otherwise I would have to contact ebay about this as well since I can easily prove my auctions are not scams. By the way, spoof e-mails can be forwarded to: spoof@ebay.com or spoof@paypal.com. They will reply with confirmation about it's origin very quickly. Joseph Santiago
  13. You should consider getting a Gliga 14" Viola for your 10 year old. There are always plenty on hand to choose from and although they are not of the highest professional quality, it will serve well until your daughter can get into a larger more common size. I am in now way associated with the Gliga Shop although I have sold many through my own shop and recommend them in certain situations. Gliga Violins USA
  14. Michael, would it be safe to bleach the color out of the wood? I recall doing this on a small portion of a violin back I once started staining years ago which looked more like a bright lemon yellow color and it worked enough to the point that once my colored varnish was over it, it was virtually unnoticeable. Joe
  15. And a 4th reason ... for those who do not put anything in the violin before varnishing to protect it from varnish drips, applying the label after makes more sense in that case, although I always stuff the violin with paper towels prior to varnishing it to catch any accidental drips, just keeps the inside and the label clean.
  16. I can see the neck grafts on #1 and #3 clearly and I THINK I see one on #2 as well ... yes? (Are you abel to confirm that info?) Not that it matters, but I think violin #2 is a beauty!
  17. It's even seen on some new modern fiddles like this one. This is the scroll of a Gliga shop violin that I currently have listed on Ebay. I have seen a few others like it from various parts of Europe too. Although I'm not quite sure what the significance of the X mark is.
  18. I'd bet that if the fiddle still has the original sound post in it, that it may be time for a new one. After about a year or so, most violins require a slightly longer post. A loose post (and possibly a shifted one because of that) can cause many problems. I'd be inclined to first look into that.
  19. I have found that 99% of all violins which I have set up sound best with the post set 1-3 mm inside the treble bridge foot, and 1-4 mm behind the bridge. I consider anything outside that area to be out of "normal" range. Of course, assuming that the fit and length were correct for any one of those exact positions as well.
  20. I don't care for the super highly gloss look myself. I go down to 800 grit, dye with black alcohol based leather dye (if desired) and finish with linseed oil and 0000 grade steel wool. They end up with a nice "sheen" but not super glossy and it tends to stay that way even after being played on.
  21. I don't apply the same ground on the neck as I do for the body of the violin. But after the final shaping of the neck/fingerboard, I use alcohol (or water) based stains, then finish with linseed oil. It's simple to do, really seals well, and accentuates the grain really nicely.
  22. Thanks for sharing those links, I enjoyed hearing the sound files ... I was able to identify the Guarneri and Strad correctly but had the other two switched. To me the tone of each violin was quite different from the others.
  23. Joseph

    Oxidation?

    If the strings are Pirastro then the color of the thread at the peg end will tell you what the strings are ... so in the case of the D, if it is pink, it is a silver wound string and if it is orange, it is aluminum wound. That goes for any of the Pirsatro brand strings. As for the others, the G is brown, the A is black the E is green.
  24. Jack, I almost always position the head of the E peg vertically simply because of the extra clearance that it allows. On some violins and for some larger hands (like mine), the peg head can sometimes get in the way while playing down in 1st position, so that is why I set it like that. So, basically I set the G, D, A at (///) and the E at (|) assuming that you're looking at the violin's bass side with the scroll to the left. Michael, I have also heard the same about the string never sounding the same once the tension is loosened and retightened (especially with gut), and I'm not sure if this is the case either as I have never really noticed it, but I do know that the more you do this the better the chances are that the windings can get damaged over the nut and/or bridge which is why I try to get it adjusted correctly the first time and never mess with it until the strings are changed. A few other tips I can give: Always bring the string back up to tension very slowly, be sure to lubricate the nut and bridge grooves well before making any adjustments, and be sure that the grooves are the right size and depth for each string.
  25. Joseph

    Oxidation?

    Assuming you are using synthetic or gut core strings ... The G strings (sometimes the D as well) are often wound with silver which oxidized rapidly wheras the D and A are usually wound in aluminum. Just get a little 0000 steel wool and wrap it around the string and gently rub it the entire length of the string and the oxidation will be easily removed, then the string will look good as new. No need to replace it every time as long as it still sounds good.
×
×
  • Create New...