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  2. What Kind of Back Wood?

    Conclusion??
  3. What Kind of Back Wood?

    Thanks to everyone who offered their opinions and expertise on this thread. I am grateful that you took the time, and I think the mystery is solved!
  4. Ideas about my new friend please?

    While not constituting proof of a composite instrument, the different purfling on the two plates is also suggestive of one.
  5. Tips for teaching vision impaired

    Excellent! Thanks for the update!
  6. Today
  7. Ideas about my new friend please?

    Ummm........ I'm quite familiar with the Historically Informed Performance genre, and have some ensembles, such as the Tallahassee Bach Parley, in the area, and I stand by my original comment. If he improves the period setup, and cleans up some issues, it'll sound better, and it'll still be a chamber instrument, not something you take to a large venue and leave your amp at home.
  8. Ideas about my new friend please?

    Exactly.
  9. Ideas about my new friend please?

    This is quite nonsense, if you want to learn something about Stainer, take some time and work it out here: This is another nonsense prejudice; if you're making the effort to hear some real baroque violins played by experienced violinists, you would be surprised that the difference exists more in your imagination than in reality. The reason that there's something wrong with the sound lies more likely in the fact, that this is an amateurish screwed together composite autodidactical fiddle.
  10. Ideas about my new friend please?

    Thanks Guido, that sounds worth a try. I tried another 3 Baroque setup instruments alongside this one, and the loudest one had a shallower neck angle and lower bridge than the others, shallower than many modern setup violins. Violadamore - I'm not hoping to achieve a modern volume. However, having heard Giuliano Carmignola with The Venice Baroque Orchestra live in a sizeable concert hall, I can say that Baroque setup violin doesn't have to sound thin and spidery - they certainly don't. Of course, I don't expect they're playing bargain basement messed about historical instruments
  11. Ideas about my new friend please?

    I'd say you're getting a lesson on why the "baroque" configuration/setup was superseded.
  12. Ideas about my new friend please?

    I would focus on playability and otherwise minimise investment. Reducing your string angle seems to be the priority. The modern equation of higher sting angle/ higher tension/ louder instrument is not always true and less tension seems to work well with some instruments.
  13. Ideas about my new friend please?

    Wherever it was made, could this be more of a Stainer body model? Some Stainer photos appear to have the characteristics of open C bouts which never really reverse direction at the ends, pointly corners, and small ff upper eyes/large ff lower eyes. Sound - I'd say 'feels like it has potential'. Quite well balanced with warmth (gut strung), but it feels like some things are holding the volume back, not least the setup maybe. The body is resonant and alive when you rub it with your fingers, but that's not currently reflected in the sound. I don't have a device for seeing inside clearly, but I think the bass bar is glued rather than carved. It's square topped, but stops some way short of the bottom of the body and gets thinner towards the neck. Maybe somone planed it? As for age, there are no specific claims made, the only suggestion I have from the dealer is 'possibly late 18thC'. Yes, it might be a bitza, but does the heavy neck heel and the fact it has a replacement top block with a screw in it plus glue seepage at the heel, suggest it was and still is a glued and screwed neck?
  14. Ideas about my new friend please?

    As long as you are waiting, I would suggest that this is a somehow composite fiddle, the neck from a different origin than the amateurish looking body. The purfling at the belly, with irregular distance to the edges, give me the impression of an altered outline. I would seriously doubt that this is as old as claimed.
  15. Ideas about my new friend please?

    I'll wait for Jacob on origin guesses. So how does it sound?
  16. Violin pegs ca. 1990

    Hi Folks, Here's some more pegs. So far just the fractional sizes. I'll add the 4/4 sizes after I sort them out and of course setting the ones for myself aside. I'll list the items for sale. Following the list I'll post details of the item with the picture(s) below the description. I will continue to add to the list as I sort out the 4/4 pegs and delete the picture and description after they are sold. I believe all these pegs were made in Germany based on the occasional "GEWA" stamp on the stock number tag and "wirbel" (peg in German) written on some of the zip lock bags. The quality looks right, but it's just a guess. I'm selling here first. Once it becomes apparent that nobodies interested I'll move all the unsold items to eBay. Feel free to post questions or comments or send me a PM. I will take payments via pay-pal. If you buy pegs and they do not meet your expectations you can return them for a refund within 7 days of receipt. Item 1. 291 ebony 1/8 size violin pegs, head width 18 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 2. 129 ebony 1/2 size violin pegs, head width 20 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 3. 89 ebony 1/2 size violin pegs, head width 20 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 4. 186 ebony 1/8 size violin pegs, head width 18 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 5. 15 ebony 3/4 size violin pegs, head width 21 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 6. 20 ebony 1/2 size violin pegs, head width 20 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 7. 90 ebony small end pins, shank diameter at collar ~7 mm . Price: $1 ea. Thanks, Jim Item 1. 291 ebony 1/8 size violin pegs, head width 18 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 2. 129 ebony 1/2 size violin pegs, head width 20 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 3. 89 ebony 1/2 size violin pegs, head width 20 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 4. 186 ebony 1/8 size violin pegs, head width 18 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 5. 15 ebony 3/4 size violin pegs, head width 21 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 6. 20 ebony 1/2 size violin pegs, head width 20 mm . Price: $1 ea. Item 7. 90 ebony small end pins, shank diameter at collar ~7 mm . Price: $1 ea.
  17. JacksonMaberry's Bench

    Using Salve HÃ¥kedal's guide, I set out to make a Baroque fingerboard. Using a Paulownia core for lightness, I laminated the sides with maple, then the top with ebony. While the ebony bent well with the water and spirit lamp trick, when I went to glue it on today it slipped and cracked. There goes $25! So I restarted the process with maple for the upper surface also. *Sigh* much more forgiving material!
  18. JacksonMaberry's Bench

    That's a huge compliment and very kind of you to say. I feel so grateful for the opportunity to learn, both at school and from the maestri e maestre here.
  19. Respect. There is only one thing remaining - renounce Gitlis. And we can start a meaningful relationship.
  20. Ideas about my new friend please?

    My guess is Klingenthal c. 1800.
  21. MikeC's bench

    I find that getting the c-bout rib and its corners done right is key to a good garland. It's sort of like "as the twig is bent so grows the tree."
  22. Ideas about my new friend please?

    I vote for Salzkammergut, with the blocks being a later Addition. late 18th/early 19th century. Lets see what Jacob Saunders has to comment on this one.
  23. Ideas about my new friend please?

    The bridge is 35mm high on the G, 32mm on the E. At the end of the fingerboard, the G is 7mm above it, the E 5mm.
  24. Ideas about my new friend please?

    Just looking at the limited photos, its seems that a fingerboard angle is a bit much. The bridge must be very high. There is a lot of variability and play in baroque setup, but this looks to be extreme, but maybe its just the photos.
  25. For John's sake, I present no arguments, but this is also my personal taste ... I can't really see anything here that actually looks like an old violin, and I find that very disconcerting, given the enormous amount of time and ingenuity that has gone into the various antiquing processes. But there are a lot of violins here and maybe I missed something.
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